aortic valve

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aor′tic valve′



n.
the semilunar valve between the left ventricle and the aorta, controlling the flow of blood.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aortic valve - a semilunar valve between the left ventricle and the aortaaortic valve - a semilunar valve between the left ventricle and the aorta; prevents blood from flowing from the aorta back into the heart
semilunar valve - a heart valve with cusps shaped like half-moons; prevents blood from flowing back into the heart
References in periodicals archive ?
Frequency by decades of unicuspid, bicuspid, and tricuspid aortic valves in adults having isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis, with or without associated aortic regurgitation.
Since 2002, percutaneous aortic valve replacement has been under evaluation as a less-invasive alternative for symptomatic high-risk patients with stenosed (hardened) aortic valves.
To be published in the February 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the trial provides the first prospective clinical evidence that aortic valves have an active biology that can be targeted with medical therapy and contradicts research published in 2005 in the New England Journal of Medicine, which concluded statins did not halt the progression of aortic stenosis.
However, there is a growing conviction among many in the medical community that ReValving[R] is indeed the procedure by which diseased aortic valves of less-sick patients will be treated in just three to five years.
A man who was born in 1939 underwent replacement of both mitral and aortic valves with porcine bioprostheses in 1987 (age 48).
The study, which was performed on human aortic valves salvaged after replacement surgery and done in collaboration with Dr.
Since 2002, transcatheter valve replacement has been under evaluation as a less-invasive alternative for symptomatic high-risk patients with stenosed (hardened) aortic valves.
Currently, American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Practice Guidelines recommend the use of tissue aortic valves for patients 65 years and older.
This significant milestone offers further dramatic evidence that CoreValve's ReValving approach to replacing diseased aortic valves can transform open-heart surgery into an interventional cardiology procedure and offer hope and quality of life to patients who would otherwise be left untreated.
2 million people over the age of 65 have calcified aortic valves, yet only an estimated 150,000 are surgically treated each year.
developer of an innovative method for removing calcium from aortic valves, today reported completion of the first human case evaluating its new Beating Heart Aortic Valve Repair (BHAVR) Demineralization System.
The study concluded that in-situ demineralization may be a safe and effective repair method for calcified, stenotic aortic valves.