apatite

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ap·a·tite

 (ăp′ə-tīt′)
n.
1. Any of a group of natural, variously colored calcium phosphate minerals containing fluorine, chlorine, or hydroxyl. These compounds form hexagonal crystals and are components of bones and teeth, are a source of phosphorus for plants, and are used in the manufacture of fertilizers.

[From Greek apatē, deceit (from its often being mistaken for other minerals).]

apatite

(ˈæpəˌtaɪt)
n
(Minerals) a pale green to purple mineral, found in igneous rocks and metamorphosed limestones. It is used in the manufacture of phosphorus, phosphates, and fertilizers. Composition: calcium fluorophosphate or calcium chlorophosphate. General formula: Ca5(PO4,CO3)3(F,OH,Cl). Crystal structure: hexagonal
[C19: from German Apatit, from Greek apatē deceit; from its misleading similarity to other minerals]

ap•a•tite

(ˈæp əˌtaɪt)

n.
a common mineral, calcium fluorophosphate, Ca5FP3O12, occurring in individual crystals and in masses and varying in color, formerly used in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers.
[1795–1805; < Greek apát(ē) trickery, fraud, deceit + -ite1]

ap·a·tite

(ăp′ə-tīt′)
A usually green, transparent mineral consisting mainly of calcium phosphate. Apatite occurs as hexagonal crystals in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks, and is used as a source of phosphate for making fertilizers. It is the mineral used to represent a hardness of 5 on the Mohs scale.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apatite - a common complex mineral consisting of calcium fluoride phosphate or calcium chloride phosphate; a source of phosphorus
atomic number 15, P, phosphorus - a multivalent nonmetallic element of the nitrogen family that occurs commonly in inorganic phosphate rocks and as organic phosphates in all living cells; is highly reactive and occurs in several allotropic forms
atomic number 65, Tb, terbium - a metallic element of the rare earth group; used in lasers; occurs in apatite and monazite and xenotime and ytterbite
atomic number 69, thulium, Tm - a soft silvery metallic element of the rare earth group; isotope 170 emits X-rays and is used in small portable X-ray machines; it occurs in monazite and apatite and xenotime
mineral - solid homogeneous inorganic substances occurring in nature having a definite chemical composition
fluorapatite - a form of apatite in which fluorine predominates over chlorine
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
BELAZ mine dump trucks fitted with equipment produced by Power Machines are successfully operating in Kuzbass, Apatites, Kovdor, Almalyk and in Slovenia, Iran and Iraq.
Rare earth element (REE) concentrations in biogenic apatites, including fossil bones, teeth and fish scales, have been used to infer palaeoseawater chemistry and redox conditions (e.
Zinc, an essential trace element in bone, has been attempted in the field of substituted apatites by considering all nature of human bones.
Rey, Formation and evolution of hydrated surface layers of apatites, Key Engineering Materials, 284(3/6), 105-108 (2005).
This study examined the influence of three types of phosphate apatites and two microbial amendments on Pb availability.
Because HA is the prototype of biological apatites, which are in nano crystalline forms, extensive efforts have been made to produce synthetic nano HA materials.
Insoluble phosphates such as apatites are considered to be promising materials for immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated waters and soils in order to reduce their solubility and ecological bioavailability [1-6].
In British soils, the apatites tend to be concentrated in the fine sand and silt and sorbed P and organic P in the clay fraction.
Thus, FRE increases with amount of carbonate substitution in apatite, with the most highly carbonate substituted apatites (i.
Crystalchemical controls on rare-earth element concentrations in fossil biogenic apatites and implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions.