apeman

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apeman

(ˈeɪpˌmæn)
n, pl -men
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) any of various extinct apelike primates thought to have been the forerunners, or closely related to the forerunners, of modern man
2. (Zoology) any of various extinct apelike primates thought to have been the forerunners, or closely related to the forerunners, of modern man
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In a moment the polished English gentleman reverted to the naked ape man.
The 6ft 3in tall sports star was spotted swimming in a hotel pool in California and his name was put forward for the 1932 film Tarzan The Ape Man.
2 TARZAN THE APE MAN (1932) OLYMPIC gold medal swimmer Johnny Weissmuller aired his famous Tarzan yell in this movie.
Miles O'Keefe has more than a hint of the modern day six pack in 1981's Tarzan The Ape Man.
unrealistic Sehdev Miles O'Keefe has more than a hint of the modern-day six pack in 1981's Tarzan the Ape Man.
She revisited the jungle in 1943's Tarzan Triumphs, playing a beautiful princess opposite Johnny Weismuller's ape man in a lost civilization taken over by Nazis.
In Return of the Ape Man (Monogram, 1944) Professor Dexter, together with Professor John Gilmore (John Carradine) used their newly-developed electro-chemical process to restore life to a tramp they had placed in frozen suspended animation four months earlier.
Then, after his swimming career ended, he became the sixth actor to portray Edgar Rice Burroughs' ape man Tarzan, a role he played in 12 movies, becoming by far the best known.
He said: "There was some disquiet in Wales in the 1930s about the influence of American culture with such films as Tarzan the Ape Man and Frankenstein.
An hour or so later, when the raffle came to be drawn, the ape man pulled his furry head off - and it was Jeremy Beadle, absolutely wet with sweat, having been boiling hot in his disguise.
3-million-year-old ape man was discovered by paleoanthropologist Dr Ron Clark in the depths of a limestone cave at Sterkfontein, South Africa.
When actor Johnny Weissmuller hollered it in Tarzan the Ape Man (1932), it was, as Taliaferro describes, "a thing of primal virtuosity.