Behn

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Behn

 (bān, bĕn), Aphra or Ayfara 1640-1689.
British writer of plays, poetry, and fiction who was one of the first professional women authors in English. Her best-known work is the prose fiction Oroonoko (1688).

Behn

(bɛn)
n
(Biography) Aphra (ˈæfrə). 1640–89, English dramatist and novelist, best known for her play The Rover (1678) and her novel Oroonoko (1688)

Behn

(beɪn)
n.
Aphra, 1640–89, English writer.
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, Aphra Behn is placed with Zora Neale Hurston in "Enter America.
Literary figures such as Mary Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft and Aphra Behn sit side-by-side with lesserknown names including Margaret, Duchess of Newcastle and Sally Salisbury, a prostitute who became famous in 17th century London for her beauty and wit.
Utopian negotiation; Aphra Behn and Margaret Cavendish.
If we must confine women's achievements to the creative arts, England's first professional female literary writer Aphra Behn, philosopher Mary Wollstonecraft, social reformer Annie Bessant or revolutionary journalist Mary Anne Evans, a.
Aphra Behn offered herself as a founding mother for a female-friendly canon only for grumpy old man Harold Bloom to dismiss her as a "fourth-rate playwright" three centuries later.
Women like Nell Gwyn, the most famous of a new generation of actresses; Aphra Behn, the first professional female writer; and Christian Davies, who disguised herself as a man to fight as a soldier.
Kavanagh rejects Aphra Behn for her 'lack of "delicacy"' (p.
The Works of Aphra Behn, The plays 1671-1677, 7 vols.
31] The first Englishwoman to earn her living by the pen, Aphra Behn launched her first dramatic production The Forc'd Marriage (1670) with a racy prologue, boldly announcing her active participation in the sexual and theatrical marketplace.
In part two, "Founding Fictions of Liberty," Doyle brings together paradigmatic transatlantic literary texts by Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Daniel Defoe, Susanna Rowson, William Hill Brown, Harriet Wilson, Olaudah Equiano, and Herman Melville.
Aphra Behn, by contrast, challenges throughout her writing "the ideological imperatives of the geosymmetrical analogies that dominate Eurocentric visions of cosmography" (208).
The final section of the book, "Renegotiating the Rhetoric of Abusive Sexuality" explores the ways in which the rhetoric of abuse was used in texts to support either the Stuart monarchy or the Interregnum by examining notable texts written by Margaret Cavendish, John Dryden, and Aphra Behn.