Aphrodite


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Aph·ro·di·te

 (ăf′rə-dī′tē)
n. Greek Mythology
The goddess of love and beauty. Also called Cytherea.

[Greek Aphrodītē, of Phoenician origin; see ʕṯtr in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Aphrodite

(ˌæfrəˈdaɪtɪ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth the goddess of love and beauty, daughter of Zeus. Roman counterpart: Venus Also called: Cytherea
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Aph•ro•di•te

(ˌæf rəˈdaɪ ti)

n.
the ancient Greek goddess of love and beauty, identified by the Romans with Venus.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aphrodite - goddess of love and beauty and daughter of Zeus in ancient mythologyAphrodite - goddess of love and beauty and daughter of Zeus in ancient mythology; identified with Roman Venus
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Afrodita
Aphrodité
Afrodyta

Aphrodite

[ˌæfrəʊˈdaɪtɪ] NAfrodita
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Aphrodite

[ˌæfrəˈdaɪtɪ] nAfrodite f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
But it may fairly be doubted whether such Hymns as those to "Demeter" (ii), "Apollo" (iii), "Hermes" (iv), "Aphrodite" (v), can have been real preludes, in spite of the closing formula `and now I will pass on to another hymn'.
The "Hymn to Aphrodite" is not the least remarkable, from a literary point of view, of the whole collection, exhibiting as it does in a masterly manner a divine being as the unwilling victim of an irresistible force.
It was, he explained, the name given to a favourite buffet at the Hotel Aphrodite, which was served by twelve wonderful girls, not one under six feet in height, and all with the most glorious golden hair.
Your Byron would have worshipped her, and you--you cold, frigid islander!--you played the austere, the insensible in the presence of an Aphrodite so exquisite?"
But I believe also in Aphrodite and Apollo and the Great God Pan."
Aphrodite, Astarte, the worships of the night--listen, infant-woman, of the great women who conquered worlds of men."
And Aphrodite rising from the sea was less wonderful and not more beautiful than Aphrodite emerging from that hole!
Astarte, who afterwards became the Aphrodite of the Greeks, was represented with horns like the half-moon, and there on the brow of the female figure are distinct horns.
Without the knowledge of their parents;or that other tale of how Hephaestus, because of similar goings on, cast a chain around Ares and Aphrodite?
She gulped down the Ode to Aphrodite during the Litany, keeping herself with difficulty from asking when Sappho lived, and what else she wrote worth reading, and contriving to come in punctually at the end with "the forgiveness of sins, the Resurrection of the body, and the life everlastin'.
WHEN Noble Energy discovered natural gas deposits in the Aphrodite field at the end of 2011, Cyprus celebrated because the impression created was that it would not be long before we would enjoy the financial benefits.
The idea of aathe "golden apple" came from the legend of Aphrodite.