Apollinarianism


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Related to Apollinarianism: Docetism, Ebionism, Gnosticism, Pelagianism, Monothelitism

Apollinarianism

a late 4th-century heretical doctrine asserting that Christ had a perfect divine nature, an imperfect human nature, and a mind replaced by the Logos. — Apollinarian, n., adj.
See also: Heresy
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(19) Early Christianity struggled against Apollinarianism, which suggested that Christ had a human body that was inhabited by the Logos, as if the Logos took the place of the soul in Christ.
John Meyendorff sees the Byzantines as believing that the Latins had fallen into Apollinarianism, denying Jesus a complete humanity.
Monophysitism had roots in two earlier movements, Apollinarianism and Nestorianism.
Next, Gudrun Munch-Labacher (Ammerbuch) in "The Divine Sonship of Jesus" concentrates on Cyril of Alexandria's Christology to explain the essential role that his understanding of Logos and of the Incarnation played during the fifth-century struggles against Apollinarianism and Nestorianism.
S.102.6 shows that Ravenna was untroubled by Apollinarianism, since Peter was able to write a paragraph that would have warmed Apollinarius' heart.
But this does not mean that Rahner has lapsed into Monophysitism (from below), Monotheletism, or Apollinarianism, as for him Christ's human nature remains genuinely human, that is to say, it is divinely human, human in a divine way, or, equally, divine in a human way.