apophthegm

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ap·o·phthegm

 (ăp′ə-thĕm′)
n.
Variant of apothegm.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

apophthegm

(ˈæpəˌθɛm) or

apothegm

n
a short cryptic remark containing some general or generally accepted truth; maxim
[C16: from Greek apophthegma, from apophthengesthai to speak one's opinion frankly, from phthengesthai to speak]
apophthegmatic, apothegmatic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ap•o•thegm

or ap•o•phthegm

(ˈæp əˌθɛm)

n.
a short, pithy saying.
[1545–55; < Greek apóphthegma <apophtheg-, variant s. of apophthéngesthai to speak out]
ap`o•theg•mat′ic (-θɛgˈmæt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apophthegm - a short pithy instructive saying
axiom, maxim - a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

apophthegm

[ˈæpəθem] Napotegma m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the sentences attributed to the Pythagorean Clitarchus we find: "reversals test friends." The unspoken premise of these apophthegms is that people are inclined to put their own interests ahead of others', and so become scarce when they are called upon to make sacrifices.
(17) The first was a collection of Stoic precepts and aphorisms, and the second of apophthegms: Charles Fantazzi, 'Vives and the emarginati', in Companion, pp.
The cell, as described in the Life of Antony and in the apophthegms, developed from a sacralized place to become a critical component of successful monastic living.
From that perspective, I think, the opposition of Heraclitus to Parmenides could well be maintained because Heraclitus obscurus, the great Greek master of apophthegms, was in a way pioneering the Christian antithetical schemes of expression which, as we will see, were supported by negative theology and by the idea of infinity.
These range from the obvious but helpful (such as Wyatt and Surrey's versions of the same Petrarch sonnet) to the unusual but revealing (such as Lady Ann Southwell's apophthegms).
Bultmann classifies this story as one of biographical apophthegms, which is also "a controversy dialogue of a sort".
He wrote: It begins sufficiently well, but the author has hardly enunciated his preliminary apophthegms, when he conducts into an obscurity where we can hardly grope our way, and when we emerge from that, it is to be bewildered by his gorgeous but unsubstantial pictures of sagely perfection.
It is only about two-thirds as long as Dryden's version, chiefly because Johnson reduces Juvenal's satirical illustrations to terse, ironic apophthegms. But, at the beginning, Johnson launches expansively and moves forward at a stately pace: Let Observation with extensive View, Survey Mankind, from China to Peru; Remark each anxious Toil, each eager Strife, And watch the busy Scenes of crouded Life; Then say how Hope and Fear, Desire and Hate, O'erspread with Snares the clouded Maze of Fate.
Less well-known are the apophthegms of various "old men" quoted in Scholia in Prov.
If all the hadith are tendentious fictions arising, precisely as Bultmann said the gospel apophthegms did, as narrative interpretations of cryptic sayings (in this case, enigmatic or incoherent Koranic passages); if the archaeological evidence shows Mecca held no special prominence in the economy of the Hejaz (northwestern Arabia) at Muhammad's time; if the surprisingly numerous contemporary non-Islamic accounts of Islamic origins indicate there was only an Arab conquest, not yet a Muslim one, that the Islamic Shari'ah (Law code) had nothing originally to do with the Koran; if Muhammad was at first the herald of the Messiah 'Umar--where are we?
The topics covered include Homer, Simonides (the new Plataea elegy), Theognis, the `wisdom' genres of proverbs, maxims, and apophthegms, tragedy (Bacchae and Ion), the behaviour of Athenian theatre-audiences (an interesting piece by Wallace), and Aristotle's attitudes to the theatre.
The story is related not in the Lives, but in the Apophthegms.