aporia

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a·po·ri·a

 (ə-pôr′ē-ə)
n.
1. A figure of speech in which the speaker expresses or purports to be in doubt about a question.
2. An insoluble contradiction or paradox in a text's meanings.

[Greek aporiā, difficulty of passing, from aporos, impassable : a-, without; see a-1 + poros, passage; see per- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aporia

(əˈpɔːrɪə)
n
1. (Rhetoric) rhetoric a doubt, real or professed, about what to do or say
2. (Philosophy) philosophy puzzlement occasioned by the raising of philosophical objections without any proffered solutions, esp in the works of Socrates
[C16: from Greek, literally: a state of being at a loss]
aporetic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

aporia

The expression of doubt about what to say or do.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
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References in periodicals archive ?
What discourse and what representations had our generation received on this adventure, the most aporetic of human experiences, a constant battle between relationships, duties and the rebellious autonomy of desire?
What is notable about the author-function is that it is both apodictic and aporetic. To illustrate the point, consider the case of a rather self-conscious attempt to obviate its reflexive implications: In the Tractatus, Wittgenstein attempts to solve the riddle that while propositions correspond to facts in a relation of "picturing," the propositions of the Tractatus itself are literally nonsensical, since they imply a perspective, outside language and the world, that would be necessary in order for one to say anything about that relationship.
The chapter on feeling deals with "moral relations" in the "Preface to Lyrical Ballads," "The Idiot Boy" and "The Thorn." In conclusion to a finely suggestive and aporetic reading of "The Thorn," Bromwich asserts that this poem is nothing less than an exploration of the primal scene of any and all moral relations.
These irruptions of irrationality within 'cargo cult' discourse are evidence of a type of 'aporetic' experience, that is, the experience of crossing an invisible boundary governing a certain form of discourse that depends upon the impermeability of this boundary (Derrida 1993).
What is crucial about this work is that while it supplies a menu of criticisms of Athenian democracy that becomes canonical among many later critics, it also acknowledges that democracy is reasonably stable and effective and issues in an aporetic conclusion that emphasizes both the defects of democratic practice and the judgment that nothing can be done to reform or overthrow it (p.
Where there is a moment of slippage there is also a robust aporetic position, rather than being either the self-righteous continuist narcissism in the name of identity, or the message of despair of nothing but Echo (my emphasis).
The Laches handles courage and is as ostensibly aporetic as the Charmides.
Frede argues that it is characteristic of the dialogue that it attempts systematically to integrate its aporetic element into a positive, constructive account of false statements.
Behind the discourse thus closed lies a less affirmative, unclosed one whose aporetic, Mahlerian authenticity leads me to welcome this book as a complex but very interesting contribution indeed.
Abrams writes with impressive critical sophistication, using many hard words (aporetic, apotropaic, epigone--"I'll get 'em all three all ready"), but his discussions of style are often tendentious, sometimes self-contradictory.
It seems that narrative logic itself, with its forking binary paths, is being denied, in favor of the experience of aporetic illogic.