transferrin

(redirected from Apotransferrin)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Apotransferrin: ferritin, hemosiderin, apoferritin

trans·fer·rin

 (trăns-fĕr′ĭn)
n.
Any of a family of proteins that are found in the blood serum of humans and other vertebrates and that combine with and transport iron.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

transferrin

(trænsˈfɜːrɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) biochem any of a group of blood glycoproteins that transport iron. Also called: beta globulin or siderophilin
[C20: from trans- + ferro- + -in]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trans•fer•rin

(trænsˈfɛr ɪn)

n.
a plasma glycoprotein that transports dietary iron to the liver, spleen, and bone marrow.
[1947; trans- + Latin ferr(um) iron + -in1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transferrin - a globulin in blood plasma that carries iron
globulin - a family of proteins found in blood and milk and muscle and in plant seed
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

trans·fer·rin

[MIM*190000]
n. transferrina, globulina beta en el plasma de la sangre que fija y transporta el hierro.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

transferrin

n transferrina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The iron-free transferrin (apotransferrin) together with TfR1 is then transported back to the plasma membrane where it is released into the blood to participate in further rounds of iron mobilization and delivery.
coli depisodomisin Ga-68-siprofloksazin Bakteriyel DNA giraz Kas-iskelet sistemi enfeksiyonlari Ga-68-klorur Transferrin Klamidya ve reseptorleri, genitouriner sistem ferritin, laktoferrin enfeksiyonlari Ga-68-TAFC/FOXE Sideroforlar; bakteri Aspergillozis ve mantarda demir tasiyicilar Ga-68-klorur/ Transferrin Kas-iskelet sistemi apotransferrin reseptorleri, enfeksiyonu ve ferritin, laktoferrin enflamasyon Ga-68-NOTA-UBI 29-41 Bakteri hucre duvari Kas iskelet sistemi enfeksiyonu, enflamasyon, tuberkuloz Tablo 2.
For the PeriTox test method, the cells were thawed and seeded at a density of 100,000 cells/[cm.sup.2] in 75 [micro]l PeriTox differentiation medium (PDM) consisting of 25% KSR-S and 75% N2-S media supplemented with 1.5 [micro]M CHIR99021, 1.5 [micro]M SU5402, and 5 [micro]M DAPT on matrigel-coated plates (KSR-S: knockout DMEM with 15% serum replacement, 1 x Glutamax, 1 x nonessential amino acids and 50 mM beta-mercaptoethanol; N2-S: DMEM/F12, with 2 mM Glutamax, 0.1 mg/ml apotransferrin, 1.55 mg/ml glucose, 25 [micro]g/ml insulin, 100 mM putrescine, 30 nM selenium, and 20 nM progesterone).
When not bound to iron, it is known as apotransferrin. When a transferrin protein loaded with iron encounters a transferrin receptor on the surface of a cell, it binds to it and, as a consequence, is transported into the cell in a vesicle by receptor-mediated endocytosis.
In this context, ceruloplasmin, the primary plasmatic copper carrier, plays a pivotal role in preventing the formation of extracellular ROS by oxidizing [Fe.sup.2+] to [Fe.sup.3+], thereby promoting the sequestration of iron by apotransferrin [17, 18].
Reference values used were: male, 65-175 ug dL-1 (11.6-31.3 umol L-1); female, 50-170 ug dL-1 (9.0-30.4 umol L-1); transferrin (Fe3+) * Apotransferrin + Fe3+; Fe+3 + Ascorbic Acid * Fe+2; Fe+2 Ferrozin * Fe+2 + Ferrozin complex.