apraxia

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a·prax·i·a

 (ā-prăk′sē-ə)
n.
Total or partial loss of the ability to perform coordinated movements or manipulate objects in the absence of motor or sensory impairment.

[Greek aprāxiā, inaction : a-, without; see a-1 + prāxis, action; see praxis.]

a·prac′tic (ā-prăk′tĭk), a·prax′ic (ā-prăk′sĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

apraxia

(əˈpræksɪə)
n
(Pathology) a disorder of the central nervous system caused by brain damage and characterized by impaired ability to carry out purposeful muscular movements
[C19: via New Latin from Greek: inactivity, from a-1 + praxis action]
aˈpraxic, aˈpractic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•prax•i•a

(əˈpræk si ə, eɪˈpræk-)

n.
a nervous disorder characterized by an inability to perform purposeful movements but not with paralysis or a loss of feeling.
[1885–90; < German Apraxie < Greek aprāxía inaction; see a-6, praxis, -ia]
a•prac′tic (-tɪk) a•prax′ic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apraxia - inability to make purposeful movementsapraxia - inability to make purposeful movements
brain disease, brain disorder, encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

a·prax·i·a

n. apraxia, falta de coordinación muscular en los movimientos causada por una afección cerebral.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

apraxia

n apraxia
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Auditory perception of sequenced words in apraxia of speech. J Speech Hear Res 1971;14:131-43.
Rosenbek, Apraxia of Speech in Adults: the Disorder and Its Management, Singular, San Diego, CA, USA, 1984.
The construction of "speech praxis" was made using variations with the associations: "oral facial praxis" OR "motor speech disorders" OR "speech praxis" OR "apraxia of speech" OR "developmental motor speech disorders" OR " developmental dyspraxia "OR" developmental verbal apraxia ".
Script training treatment for adults with apraxia of speech, American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 20, 23-37.
A comparasion of two treatments for childhood apraxia of speech: methods and treatment protocol for a parallel group randomized control trial.
It has been well established that as a matter of fact, Broca's aphasia includes two different abnormalities: (a) a motor production defect characterized by decreased fluency, abnormalities in the speech kinetic melodies, articulation slowness, and so forth, referred to as apraxia of speech, and (b) a disturbance in the use of grammar usually known as agrammatism [40, 46, 51, 84].
By the definition available on the website of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) located in the United States of America, apraxia of speech, also known as verbal apraxia or dyspraxia, is a speech disorder in which a person encounters difficulties in speaking, he or she is not able to express himself or herself correctly and appropriately (NIDCD 2012).
According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, childhood apraxia of speech, or CAS, is a motor speech disorder.
The topics include normal vowel development, the acoustic measurement of vowels, recurring patterns and idiosyncratic systems in some English children with vowel disorders, vowel production in childhood and acquired apraxia of speech, vowel perception in listeners with cochlear implants, and the clinical phonology of vowel disorders.
Two major categories can be distinguished within the motor speech disorders: apraxia of speech and dysarthria (Duffy, 1995; Roig-Quillis & Rodriguez-Palmero, 2008; Gamboa, Jimenez-Jimenez, Mate, & Cobeta, 2001).
In this third edition, Kumin has broadened information on the needs of children with childhood apraxia of speech, and also covers a dual diagnosis of Down syndrome and autism.
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 Positron Emission Tomography in Progressive Apraxia of Speech and Primary Progressive Aphasia Variants.