aquitard


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to aquitard: Aquiclude, aquifuge

aq·ui·tard

 (ăk′wə-tärd′, ä′kwə-)
n.
A body of rock or stratum of sediment that retards but does not prevent the flow of groundwater from one aquifer to another.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The delay index is only dependent on the properties and thickness of the aquitard in response to the sudden change in groundwater level in adjacent confined aquifers according to experimental studies [19].
The frozen layers act as special regional aquiclude or aquitard layers and block or weaken the hydraulic connections between the surface water and groundwater, which make the hydrological cycle complex [4, 14-16].
In this study, we assessed archaeal diversity in aquifer and aquitard rocks of a mixed carbonate-/siliciclastic-rock aquifer system, as well as in surface soils, along a transect of monitoring wells in the Hainich Critical Zone Exploratory (CZE) in central Germany.
Distribution of nitrate in groundwater affected by the presence of an aquitard at an agricultural area in Chiba, Japan.
Using published values for the hydraulic conductivity of bedrock and overburden, they concluded that the mining does not influence the Selisoo water regime because the hydraulic conductivity of the Oandu aquitard and oligotrophic peat layer is low and usually the annual rainfall is larger than 540 mm [yr.sup.-1] that is sufficient to keep mire water balance positive.
The sequence above the coal seam can be classified as an aquitard consists of top soil and the clay, and the rest of sequences can be classified as an aquifer that includes fine to coarse sand with silt.
Hendry, "Trace element geochemistry of a thick till and clay-rich aquitard sequence, Saskatchewan, Canada," Chemical Geology, vol.
In 2008, the mine was found to be damaging the aquitard, the dense layer of rock that forms a natural protective barrier between the aquifer--the city's water supply--and surface.