Aragonese


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Ar·a·gon

 (ăr′ə-gŏn′)
A region and former kingdom of northeast Spain. It was united with Castile in 1479 to form the nucleus of modern Spain.

Ar′a·go·nese′ (ăr′ə-gə-nēz′, -nēs′) adj. & n.

Aragonese

(ˌærəɡəˈniːz)
n, pl -nese
(Placename) a native or inhabitant of Aragon
adj
(Placename) of or relating to Aragon or its inhabitants

Ar•a•go•nese

(ˌær ə gəˈniz, -ˈnis)

n., pl. -nese,
adj. n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Aragon.
2. the Spanish dialect of Aragon, now largely restricted to the central Pyrenees.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to Aragon, its inhabitants, or their speech.
[1505–15]
Translations
aragonisk
aragonaisaragonaise
アラゴンのアラゴン人アラゴン語

Aragonese

[ˌærəgəˈniːz]
A. ADJaragonés
B. N
1. (= person) → aragonés/esa m/f
2. (Ling) → aragonés m
References in classic literature ?
The first is some words that I have read in the preface; the next that the language is Aragonese, for sometimes he writes without articles; and the third, which above all stamps him as ignorant, is that he goes wrong and departs from the truth in the most important part of the history, for here he says that my squire Sancho Panza's wife is called Mari Gutierrez, when she is called nothing of the sort, but Teresa Panza; and when a man errs on such an important point as this there is good reason to fear that he is in error on every other point in the history.
With this they exchanged farewells, and Don Quixote and Sancho retired to their room, leaving Don Juan and Don Jeronimo amazed to see the medley he made of his good sense and his craziness; and they felt thoroughly convinced that these, and not those their Aragonese author described, were the genuine Don Quixote and Sancho.
In the crypt, the child's coffin rests near dozens of other wooden burial boxes, some of which held the bodies of Aragonese princes and Neapolitan nobles.
The Aragonese authorities have been trying to recover the works through the courts, arguing they were unlawfully sold.
Peter, the Aragonese king, exploited the opportunity to land with his war fleet on the island.
Another achievement particularly worth noting is his contribution, starting in the 1970s, to the vegetation mapping of the Ebro basin, mid Aragon, the Aragonese Pyrenees, and to forestry maps.
The battle of Teruel alone saw more than 140,000 casualties and left much of the city a pile of rubble, while the Republican offensive on Zaragoza spread a trail of destruction for miles around the Aragonese capital.
After the Normans defeated the Byzantines, they introduced a feudal regime which was perpetuated by subsequent Swabian, Angevin, and Aragonese rulers.
The island's iconic Aragonese castle, perched on volcanic rock, has featured in films such as Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton's Cleopatra and, more recently, The Talented Mr Ripley.
1270-1285), or the Aragonese monarch, Jaime I (1208-1276), Alfonso's father-in-law.
argues that his birthplace was Tudela, in Navarra, a refuge for persecuted Aragonese Jews.