Aramaism

Aramaism

a word, phrase, idiom, or other characteristic of Aramaic occurring in a corpus written in another language.
See also: Language
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Justifying Christian Aramaism: Editions and Latin Translations of the Targums From the Complutensian to the London Polyglot Bible (1517-1657)
17.11 apparently contradicts the widely accepted notion that the q[??]tal nominal pattern is a characteristically late Aramaism. However, textual evidence, in the form of the testimony of several of the ancient versions along with the difficulty of the MT as is, would seem to indicate that the form in question is due to a corruption, and not an early occurrence of a distinctively late form (cf.
Hebrew and Aramaic in the Biblical Period: The Problem of "Aramaisms" in Linguistic Research on the Hebrew Bible.
18:2 introduces a statement about the future not found in Samuel, saying erhamekha (using an Aramaism for "love"): I will love You, O Lord, my support.
Matthew's Jewish audience can understand the Aramaism, but Mark, who normally translates Aramaisms (e.g., Mark 7:34) into Greek, purposely does not here.
In this case "bar" would be an Aramaism, like Proverbs 31:2, which uses "bar" three times.
The reference in CAD 93b is to an Aramaism, see also mar zeri Teldarbeiter' AHw s.v.
(16.) Since this word is placed in the mouth of Laban, it may be an Aramaism of Akkadian background.
Akkadian words borrowed through Aramaic are for all intents and purposes Aramaisms, having the same historical significance for dating documents as simple Aramaisms.
Because the root kbr is relatively common in Samalian,(1) Old Aramaic,(2) and Middle Aramaic,(3) and yet rare in Biblical Hebrew (BH), one might be inclined to view kabbir as an Aramaism in the Bible.(4)
Biblical scholars still are not agreed as to what constitutes an Aramaism.(5) But as most use the term, namely, as a lexical or grammatical influence from Aramaic in Hebrew, in the case of kabbir this is not a perfectly accurate appellation.
Kaufman noted that in a number of famous instances the speech of Transjordanians is tinged with unusual grammatical forms and rare lexical items, many of which typically are classified as Aramaisms.(6) He undoubtedly is correct that in these texts "we have not to do with late language or foreign authors, but rather with the intentional stylistic representations of Trans-Jordanian speech on the part of Hebrew authors within Hebrew texts."(7) Among the key texts that Kaufman used to illustrate this point was the book of Job.