archetypally


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Translations

archetypally

[ˌɑːkɪˈtaɪpəlɪ] ADVarquetípicamente

archetypally

advarchetypisch
References in periodicals archive ?
IAfter all, Sunday's solitary strike was only the 18th of Phil Jagielka's 381 Everton appearances, and not the area in which the archetypally typical old fashioned centre-back is expected to flourish.
Archetypally, the ads did resemble anti-Semitic campaigns of yore.
Gender attributes are archetypally assigned to males and females, including expectations about masculinity and femininity, biological sex, and gender expression (Eller, 2015).
Credence, however, barely appears in the actual movie -- his story spread out across the whole saga -- our hero, once again, being Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne), the shy zoologist who's unflappably eccentric and as archetypally English as Dr.
But instead of sentimental figures meant to represent the "moral good" of American society--pious wives, noble orphans, humble priests--, Whitman sketches much broader, archetypally paired roles (young, old, man, woman) that strive to unite where the sentimental tends to differentiate and judge.
Splitting is archetypally embedded in a person's psychic structure, and acts as a powerful unconscious force to protect against the ego's perception of dangerous anxiety and intense affects.
functioned neither in the archetypally mythic way that actual dress did
They stressed the 'as found' condition of lived reality rather than the archetypally Modern conception of tabula rasa.
She defies the archetypally expected maternal role by offering veracities whilst acknowledging her part as the mother and also the complexity of playing this role.
[6] Outcomes are not considered as "values, attitudes, feelings, beliefs, activities, assignments, goals, scores, grades, or averages, as many people believe." Archetypally, these are performances, students learn through their educational program.
In the US, the national news media presented the mothers of US combat soldiers in the Iraq War as archetypally good mothers, who continue their maternal work even after their children are deployed.
Spirits called buda are widely known across Highland Orthodox Ethiopia and beyond, but in the majority of cases these are thought to be hereditary, essential to the person rather than acquired, and associated with certain marginal groups: archetypally, weavers, potters, or the Beta Israel or 'Falasha' (Rodinson 1967; Pankhurst 1992; Reminick 1974; Salamon 1999; Finneran 2003; Lyons 2014).