archetype

(redirected from Archetypes)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

ar·che·type

 (är′kĭ-tīp′)
n.
1. An original model or type after which other similar things are patterned; a prototype: "'Frankenstein' ... 'Dracula' ... 'Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde' ... the archetypes that have influenced all subsequent horror stories" (New York Times).
2. An ideal example of a type; quintessence: an archetype of the successful entrepreneur.
3. In Jungian psychology, an inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from past collective experience and present in the individual unconscious.

[Latin archetypum, from Greek arkhetupon, from neuter of arkhetupos, original : arkhe-, arkhi-, archi- + tupos, model, stamp.]

ar′che·typ′al (-tī′pəl), ar′che·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), ar′che·typ′i·cal adj.
ar′che·typ′i·cal·ly adv.
Usage Note: The ch in archetype, and in many other English words of Greek origin such as architect and chorus, represents a transliteration of Greek X (chi), and its standard pronunciation is (k). The pronunciation of ch in these words as (ch) is generally considered incorrect. Notable exceptions in which the ch is in fact pronounced (ch) include words formed by adding the prefix arch- to an existing English word, as in archenemy or archrival, and also words such as archbishop and archdeacon that date back to Old English, having been borrowed directly from Late Latin and Late Greek.

archetype

or

architype

n
1. a perfect or typical specimen
2. an original model or pattern; prototype
3. (Psychoanalysis) psychoanal one of the inherited mental images postulated by Jung as the content of the collective unconscious
4. (Art Terms) a constantly recurring symbol or motif in literature, painting, etc
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a constantly recurring symbol or motif in literature, painting, etc
[C17: from Latin archetypum an original, from Greek arkhetupon, from arkhetupos first-moulded; see arch-, type]

ar•che•type

(ˈɑr kɪˌtaɪp)

n.
1. the original pattern or model from which all things of the same kind are copied or on which they are based; prototype.
2. (in Jungian psychology) an inherited unconscious idea, pattern of thought, image, etc., universally present in individual psyches.
[1595–1605; < Latin archetypum < Greek archétypon, neuter of archétypos molded first, archetypal]
ar`che•typ′al (-ˌtaɪ pəl) ar`che•typ′i•cal (-ˈtɪp ɪ kəl) adj.
ar`che•typ′al•ly, ar`che•typ′i•cal•ly, adv.

archetype

Jung used this term to refer to such universal concepts as the “here,” which he saw as part of the collective unconscious—that part of the mind inherited from the experience of previous generations and common to us all.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.archetype - something that serves as a model or a basis for making copies; "this painting is a copy of the original"
example, model - a representative form or pattern; "I profited from his example"

archetype

noun prime example, standard, model, original, pattern, classic, ideal, norm, form, prototype, paradigm, exemplar He is the archetype of the successful businessman.

archetype

noun
A first form from which varieties arise or imitations are made:
Translations
arkkityyppimalliesimerkkiperikuva

archetype

[ˈɑːkɪtaɪp] N
1. (= original) → arquetipo m
2. (= epitome) → modelo m, arquetipo m

archetype

[ˈɑːrkɪtaɪp] nprototype m, archétype m

archetype

nArchetyp(us) m (form); (= original, epitome also)Urbild nt, → Urtyp m

archetype

[ˈɑːkɪˌtaɪp] n (original) → archetipo; (epitome) → prototipo

ar·che·type

n. arquetipo, tipo original ideal del que se derivan versiones modificadas.
References in classic literature ?
If we suppose that the ancient progenitor, the archetype as it may be called, of all mammals, had its limbs constructed on the existing general pattern, for whatever purpose they served, we can at once perceive the plain signification of the homologous construction of the limbs throughout the whole class.
Tourists in Normandy, Brittany, Maine, and Anjou must all have seen in the capitals of those provinces many houses which resemble more or less that of the Cormons; for it is, in its way, an archetype of the burgher houses in that region of France, and it deserves a place in this history because it serves to explain manners and customs, and represents ideas.
What appears once in the atmosphere may appear often, and it was undoubtedly the archetype of that familiar ornament.
In Carl Jung's magnum opus 'Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious,' one of the greatest psychologists of the modern era discussed the presence of 'archaic and mythological thought-forms' common across cultures and time.
She focuses on Buffy in Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Katniss in the Hunger Games trilogy, and Princess Merida in Brave, as well as related promotional paratexts, femslash fan fiction, and fan art, showing how portrayals of girl warriors challenge archetypes of the male hero and the damsel in distress and the myth that heroes must be white, masculine, heterosexual, and privileged patriarchs and how representations of girl warriors rework ideas of ideal girlhood and emphasize feminism as a tool in the fight for equality.
Archetypes are universal characters used in storytelling: if you hear "hero," "outlaw" or "lover," you instinctively assume that a hero is courageous, an outlaw is disruptive and a lover is sensual.
"Encounters With Archetypes: Integrated ELA Lessons for Gifted and Advanced Learners in Grades 4-5" integrates the study of archetypes with the concept of encounters.
The ISG Provider Lens Archetype Report for Digital Business Transformation examines five different types of clients, or archetypes, that are looking for providers to help them with their digital transformations.
"Brands that stay true to their essence and are able to leverage archetypes like 'identity' will ultimately build stronger relationships with consumers," he added.-TradeArabia News Service
well maybe would invite the archetypes the brother the sister maybe
Many scholars in the field of Jungian psychology have utilized neuroscience as a means of exploring the validity of Jungian archetypes and to further develop archetypal ideas (Goodwyn, 2010, 2013; Hogenson, 2009; Knox, 2004, 2010; Merchant, 2009, 2016; Stevens, 1995).
Drawing on ancient tradition and modern experience, The Circle of Nine describes nine female archetypes and the ways women can utilize them to enrich their lives and strengthen their spirits.