Grey Owl

(redirected from Archie Belaney)

Grey Owl

n
(Biography) Grey Owl, original name Archibald Belaney (1888–1938). Canadian writer and conservationist, born in England; adopted Native American identity
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Examples of such work might include Dorothy Livesay's Call My People Home (1950), a treatment of the Japanese-Canadian internment; Armand Garnet Ruffo's Grey Owl (1996), a deconstruction of the life of Archie Belaney, an Englishman who posed famously as an Ojibwa; or Andrew Suknaski's Wood Mountain Poems (1976), an examination of Southwest Saskatchewan history that gives voice to Indigenous and settler experience.
The lesser-known folks among the pages, such as Canadian conservationist Archie Belaney, also known as Grey Owl, and Emperor Joshua A.
His reputation was transformed radically, however, after he died in April 1938, and it was revealed that he was not of mixed Scottish-Apache ancestry, as he had often claimed, but was in fact an Englishman named Archie Belaney. Born into a privileged family in the dominant culture of his time, what compelled him to flee to a far less powerful one?
Grey Owl was the assumed name of British naturalist Archie Belaney, who posed as a Native American for many years in northern Quebec.
ARCHIE BELANEY, born in a small English town in 1888, practised a comparatively benign form of secrecy and deception.
Archie Belaney he knows was a "hard-drinking, knife-throwing cad," but Grey Owl, the name he gave his invented new identity was a man "who changed the way people felt about nature," a man who wrote lovingly about the wilderness, as Casey does throughout.
These included a lifelong pre-occupation with Archie Belaney otherwise known as Grey Owl, an English born Canadian conservationist in the guise of an Indian.
That book, Grey Owl: The Mystery of Archie Belaney, published in 1996, was one of the works Ruffo read from on Jan.
To Brereton Greenhous, he was "a distinguished fraud," worthy company for "bogus characters" like Laura Secord ("heroine" of the War of 1812); Archie Belaney, the Englishman who masqueraded as Grey Owl; and Lili St.
Armand Ruffo, an author and director of the Centre for Aboriginal Education, Research and Culture at Carleton University, published his second book, Grey Owl: The Mystery of Archie Belaney, in 1997.
Richard Attenborough's biopic of Hastings-born, Canada-dwelling Archie Belaney (Pierce Brosnan) who, during the 1930s, fooled everyone into believing he was a half-breed Native American
But Grey Owl was, in fact, Archie Belaney - an Englishman born in Hastings and raised by a pair of maiden aunts.