Frigid Zone

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Frig·id Zone

 (frĭj′ĭd)
Either of two extreme latitude zones of the earth, the North Frigid Zone, between the North Pole and the Arctic Circle, or the South Frigid Zone, between the South Pole and the Antarctic Circle.

Frigid Zone

n
(Physical Geography) archaic the cold region inside the Arctic or Antarctic Circle where the sun's rays are very oblique

Frig′id Zone`


n.
either of two regions, one between the Arctic Circle and the North Pole, or one between the Antarctic Circle and the South Pole.

Frig·id Zone

(frĭj′ĭd)
Either of two zones of the Earth of extreme latitude, the North Frigid Zone, extending north of the Arctic Circle, or the South Frigid Zone, extending south of the Antarctic Circle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Frigid Zone - the part of the Earth's surface forming a cap over a poleFrigid Zone - the part of the Earth's surface forming a cap over a pole; characterized by frigid climate
climatic zone - any of the geographical zones loosely divided according to prevailing climate and latitude
References in periodicals archive ?
Predominant narratives focus on the role of Russia's Arctic policy in increasing tensions in the Arctic, the responses of other Arctic states to Russian behaviour, the increased interest from the United States in the region, the interest being shown by non-Arctic states such as China, and the emerging global governance architecture embodied mainly in the Arctic Council.
In recognition of the need for the international community to work together in addressing both the challenges and opportunities arising in today's Arctic, the United States chose "One Arctic: Shared Opportunities, Challenges and Responsibilities" as its chairmanship theme.
These changes have potential consequences for weather in the United States, access to mineral and biological resources in the Arctic, the economies and cultures of peoples in the region, and national security.
Therefore, because of the effects of global warming in the Arctic, the Arctic's impact upon global climate, and the increasing interconnectedness of the Arctic to the rest of the world via globalization, it "is clear that the Arctic cannot go its own way, carving out a developmental path independent of global forces.
These include the economic and technological viability of transport through the Arctic, the impact on the environment and indigenous communities, and political and territorial disputes with Arctic states.