lugworm

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lug·worm

 (lŭg′wûrm′)
n.
Any of various burrowing marine annelid worms of the genus Arenicola, especially A. marina, often used as fishing bait. Also called lobworm.

[Origin unknown.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lugworm

(ˈlʌɡˌwɜːm)
n
(Animals) any polychaete worm of the genus Arenicola, living in burrows on sandy shores and having tufted gills: much used as bait by fishermen. Sometimes shortened to: lug Also called: lobworm
[C17: of uncertain origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lug•worm

(ˈlʌgˌwɜrm)

n.
any burrowing annelid worm of the genus Arenicola, of ocean shores, having tufted gills.
[1795–1805]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lugworm - marine worms having a row of tufted gills along each side of the backlugworm - marine worms having a row of tufted gills along each side of the back; often used for fishing bait
class Polychaeta, Polychaeta - marine annelid worms
polychaete, polychaete worm, polychete, polychete worm - chiefly marine annelids possessing both sexes and having paired appendages (parapodia) bearing bristles
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

lugworm

[ˈlʌgˌwɜːm] Nlombriz f de tierra
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lugworm

nKöderwurm m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

lugworm

[ˈlʌgˌwɜːm] narenicola
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The Arenicola marina - more commonly known as the lugworm - plays an important role in fisheries as a source of bait and is a source of food for wader birds and fish.
Browne ran laboratory experiments with colleagues in the United Kingdom in which they exposed lugworms (Arenicola marina) to sand with 5 percent microplastic (polyvinylchloride) that also contained common chemical pollutants (nonylphenol, phenanthrene) and additives (triclosan, PBDE-47).
Roedd y gwymon yn llipa yn disgwyl i'r llanw anadlu anadl einioes iddynt ac roedd olion abwyd y tywod (Arenicola marina; lugworm).
Seasonality of energetic functioning and production of reactive oxygen species by lugworm (Arenicola marina) mitochondria exposed to acute temperature changes.
These signals are very similar in shape to those we recorded in the laboratory for Abarenicola and those Wells (1949) recorded for Arenicola marina, but they occur at 5-min intervals rather than at the typical 15-min intervals of defecation for A.
Mae'r gylfinir 'i phig hir yn gallu tyllu i lawr gryn bellter er mwyn dal anifeiliaid fel abwyd y tywod (Arenicola marina; lugworm).
Endogenous enzymatic production has been shown in tissues from mammals (1, 11-13), the clam Tapes philippinarum and the annelid Arenicola marina (14), and the clam Mercenaria mercenaria (15).
'Lugworm' ydi'r enw cyffredin yn Saesneg am abwyd y tywod ac Arenicola marina ydi'r enw gwyddonol.
Other presumed chemosensory structures have been described from polychaetes, including epidermal papillae of the deposit-feeding lugworm Arenicola marina (Jouin et al., 1985), compound sensory organs on the prostomial cirri and palps of Nereis diversicolor (Dorsett and Hyde, 1969), and the parapodial cirri of nereidid polychaetes (Boilly-Marer, 1972).
Reit i lawr ar fin y dwer, ble mae 'na fymryn o dywod, roedd olion baw abwyd y tywod neu'r lwgwn (Arenicola marina; lugworm) yn dorchau ar wyneb y tywod.