Argand diagram


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Argand diagram

(ˈɑːɡænd)
n
(Mathematics) maths a diagram in which complex numbers are represented by the points in the plane the coordinates of which are respectively the real and imaginary parts of the number, so that the number x + iy is represented by the point (x, y), or by the corresponding vector <x, y>. If the polar coordinates of (x, y) are (r, θ), r is the modulus and θ the argument of x + iy. See also amplitude5
[C19: named after Jean-Robert Argand (1768–1822), French mathematician]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The plane on which imaginary (and complex) numbers are plotted is called an Argand Diagram or the Complex Plane.
In figure 1, The Argand diagram represents the complex numbers lying on a plane.
These points of intersection are, of course, none other than the three points plotted in the Argand diagram in Figure 1.
Plot the corresponding points in the Argand diagram, and join the pairs of successive points to form a "spiral".
With the Argand diagram we now have a way of picturing i, but what is i?