Strasbourg

(redirected from Argentorate)
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Stras·bourg

 (sträs′bo͝org′, sträz′-, sträz-bo͝or′)
A city of northeast France near the German border east of Nancy. Originally a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire, it was occupied by France in 1681, passed to Germany in 1871, and was recovered by France in 1919. It now serves as the seat of the parliament of the European Union.

Strasbourg

(French strasbur; English ˈstræzbɜːɡ)
n
(Placename) a city in NE France, on the Rhine: the chief French inland port; under German rule (1870–1918); university (1567); seat of the Council of Europe and of the European Parliament. Pop: 276 867 (2006). German name: Strassburg

Stras•bourg

(ˈstræs bɜrg, ˈstrɑz bʊərg)

n.
a city in NE France, near the Rhine. 257,303. German, Strass•burg (ˈʃtrɑs bʊrk)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Strasbourg - city on the Rhine in eastern France near the German borderStrasbourg - city on the Rhine in eastern France near the German border; an inland port
Translations
Štrasburg
Strasbūras
Strasburg
Štrasburg

Strasbourg

[ˈstræzbɜːg] NEstrasburgo m

Strasbourg

[ˈstræzbɜːrg] nStrasbourg

Strasbourg

nStraßburg nt

Strasbourg

[ˈstræzbɜːg] nStrasburgo f
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the career of any senator from an undistinguished background, whatever his talents, needed assistance to prosper, it was important that such assistance came from suitable sources: Levick makes a case for influential connections with Vespasian among the Vitellii and Plautii, who flourished in the first half of Claudius' reign, but Suetonius highlights the role of Narcissus in securing for Vespasian command of Legio II Augusta, stationed at Argentorate (Strasbourg in Upper Germany), in AD 42: (39) the formulation Claudio principe Narcissi gratia demonstrates sharply where the real power lay.
El ultimo escalon que conduce al techo de la catedral brinda la oportunidad de poder contemplar ampliamente a una de las ciudades mas hermosas de Francia: Estrasburgo, conocida en la epoca galo-romana como Argentorum o en el antiguo celta como Argentorate.
The attestation quoted of materna lingua, at the beginning of the twelfth century, 1119 to be precise, (12) is by Hesso 'magister scholarum argentinensis', that is, from Argentorate, or Strasburg, who, according to Weisgerger, must have based his Latin phrase on his native German expression Mutter Sprache.