Argo


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Ar·go

 (är′gō′)
n.
1. Greek Mythology The ship in which Jason sailed in search of the Golden Fleece.
2. Formerly, a constellation in the Southern Hemisphere, lying between Canis Major and the Southern Cross, now divided into four smaller constellations, Carina, Puppis, Pyxis, and Vela.

[Latin Argō, from Greek.]

Argo

(ˈɑːɡəʊ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth the ship in which Jason sailed in search of the Golden Fleece

Argo

(ˈɑːɡəʊ)
n, Latin genitive Argus (ˈɑːɡəs)
(Astronomy) an extensive constellation in the S hemisphere now subdivided into the smaller constellations of Puppis, Vela, Carina, and Pyxis. Also called: Argo Navis

Ar•go

(ˈɑr goʊ)

n. gen. Ar•gus (ˈɑr gəs)
for 1.
1. a very large southern constellation, now divided into four, lying south of Canis Major.
2. (italics) the ship in which Jason sailed in quest of the Golden Fleece.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Argo - formerly a large constellation in the southern hemisphere between Canis Major and the Southern Cross; now divided into Carina and Pyxis and Puppis and Vela
Carina - a keel-shaped constellation in the southern hemisphere; contains the start Canopus
Puppis - a constellation in the southern hemisphere between Vela and Canis Major that shaped like the stern of a boat
Pyxis - a constellation in the southern hemisphere near Puppis and Antlia
Vela - a constellation in the southern hemisphere between Carina and Pyxis; "because of its configuration Vela is sometimes called `the Sails'"
References in classic literature ?
they came through the Ocean to Libya, and so, carrying the Argo, reached our sea.
Fragment #17 -- Hecataeus (15) in Scholiast on Euripides, Orestes, 872: Aegyptus himself did not go to Argos, but sent his sons, fifty in number, as Hesiod represented.
4: Acrisius was king of Argos and Proetus of Tiryns.
Had you heard it from aboard the Argo, you would have declared it to be the sirens singing, and it would have been found necessary to lash you to the mast.
For which reason they compel all those who are very eminent for their power, their fortune, their friendships, or any other cause which may give them too great weight in the government, to submit to the ostracism, and leave the city for a stated time; as the fabulous histories relate the Argonauts served Hercules, for they refused to take him with them in the ship Argo on account of his superior valour.
Atreus, when he died, left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes in his turn left it to be borne by Agamemnon, that he might be lord of all Argos and of the isles.
Cruel Jove gave me his solemn promise that I should sack the city of Priam before returning, but he has played me false, and is now bidding me go ingloriously back to Argos with the loss of much people.
They forget the promise they made you when they set out from Argos, that you should not return till you had sacked the town of Troy, and, like children or widowed women, they murmur and would set off homeward.
We may instance the statue of Mitys at Argos, which fell upon his murderer while he was a spectator at a festival, and killed him.
Four days later Diomed and his men stationed their ships in Argos, but I held on for Pylos, and the wind never fell light from the day when heaven first made it fair for me.
Was Menelaus away from Achaean Argos, voyaging elsewhither among mankind, that Aegisthus took heart and killed Agamemnon?
If Menelaus when he got back from Troy had found Aegisthus still alive in his house, there would have been no barrow heaped up for him, not even when he was dead, but he would have been thrown outside the city to dogs and vultures, and not a woman would have mourned him, for he had done a deed of great wickedness; but we were over there, fighting hard at Troy, and Aegisthus, who was taking his ease quietly in the heart of Argos, cajoled Agamemnon's wife Clytemnestra with incessant flattery.