fallacy

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fal·la·cy

 (făl′ə-sē)
n. pl. fal·la·cies
1. A false notion.
2. A statement or an argument based on a false or invalid inference.
3. Incorrectness of reasoning or belief; erroneousness.
4. The quality of being deceptive.

[Alteration of Middle English fallace, from Old French, from Latin fallācia, deceit, from fallāx, fallāc-, deceitful, from fallere, to deceive.]

fallacy

(ˈfæləsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. an incorrect or misleading notion or opinion based on inaccurate facts or invalid reasoning
2. unsound or invalid reasoning
3. the tendency to mislead
4. (Logic) logic an error in reasoning that renders an argument logically invalid
[C15: from Latin fallācia, from fallax deceitful, from fallere to deceive]

fal•la•cy

(ˈfæl ə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. a deceptive, misleading, or false notion, belief, etc.; misconception.
2. a misleading or unsound argument.
3. erroneousness.
4. any of various types of erroneous reasoning that render arguments logically unsound.
5. Obs. deception.
[1350–1400; Middle English fallace < Middle French < Latin fallācia a trick, deceit]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fallacy - a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
pseudoscience - an activity resembling science but based on fallacious assumptions
misconception - an incorrect conception
logical fallacy - a fallacy in logical argumentation
pathetic fallacy - the fallacy of attributing human feelings to inanimate objects; `the friendly sun' is an example of the pathetic fallacy
sophism, sophistry, sophistication - a deliberately invalid argument displaying ingenuity in reasoning in the hope of deceiving someone
paralogism - an unintentionally invalid argument

fallacy

fallacy

noun
1. An erroneous or false idea:
2. Plausible but invalid reasoning:
Translations
مَظْهَر خادِع، مُغالَطَه
bludklamomyl
fejlslutningvildfarelse
téveszme
röng hugmynd, villa
klaidinga nuomonėklaidingas įsitikinimas
kļūdamaldi

fallacy

[ˈfæləsɪ] N (= false belief) → falacia f; (= false reasoning) → sofisma m, argucia f

fallacy

[ˈfæləsi] nidée f fausse
it is a fallacy that ... → il est faux de croire que ...

fallacy

nIrrtum m; (in logic) → Fehlschluss m, → Trugschluss m; a popular fallacyein weitverbreiteter Irrtum

fallacy

[ˈfæləsɪ] nerrore m

fallacy

(ˈfӕləsi) plural ˈfallacies noun
a wrong idea or belief, usually one that is generally believed to be true; false reasoning. That belief is just a fallacy.
fallacious (fəˈleiʃəs) adjective
wrong, mistaken or showing false reasoning. a fallacious argument.
References in classic literature ?
Now and then, losing his calm as he felt himself more and more foolish, Hayward became abusive, and only the American's smiling politeness prevented the argument from degenerating into a quarrel.
The first is argumentum ad verecundiam, or the fallacy of argument from authority.
Then he analyzes the argument itself, in such terms as the argument from likelihood, roots and varieties of the peritrope, the contrasting arguments antilogoi and antithesis, witness testimony and the appeal to character, and justice and the value of sophistic argument.
Nagasawa next critiques versions of the argument from concept posses sion against theism.
It is how Johnson separates argument from other discourse: "The chief differentiating factor is that in the practice of argumentation, truth is a fundamental consideration" (p.
The author discusses Graham Priest's argument from the liar paradox to dialetheism (the view that there are true contradictions).
What is it that distinguishes the sets of statements in which one of their members is a logical consequence of the rest as an argument from those which are not?
The argument from positive freedom asks us to see lack of an opportunity due to poverty or disability, say, as something that prevents someone from choosing that opportunity, and overt coercion as simply removing alternatives one would otherwise have.
Actually Johnson borrowed that argument from Harry Truman, who saw a communist Korea as a dagger aimed at the heart of Japan.
One might call this the argument from personal blindness: "I see no difference between men and animals, and will govern myself accordingly.