Arikara

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A·rik·a·ra

 (ə-rĭk′ər-ə)
n. pl. Arikara or A·rik·a·ras
1. A member of a Native American people formerly inhabiting the Missouri River valley from Kansas into the Dakotas and now located in western North Dakota. Traditional Arikara life was based on agriculture and trade with the Plains Indians to the west.
2. The Caddoan language of the Arikara.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

A•rik•a•ra

(əˈrɪk ər ə)

n., pl. -ras, (esp. collectively) -ra.
1. a member of an American Indian people of North Dakota.
2. the Caddoan language of the Arikara, closely related to Pawnee.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Arikara - a member of the Caddo people who formerly lived in the Dakotas west of the Missouri riverArikara - a member of the Caddo people who formerly lived in the Dakotas west of the Missouri river
Caddo - a group of Plains Indians formerly living in what is now North and South Dakota and Nebraska and Kansas and Arkansas and Louisiana and Oklahoma and Texas
2.Arikara - the Caddoan language spoken by the Arikara
Caddoan, Caddoan language, Caddo - a family of North American Indian languages spoken widely in the Midwest by the Caddo
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, in at least the early part of the same interval, the more northerly Great Plains, in the vicinity of the Colorado/Wyoming border, remained a depocenter, mainly for fine-grained deposits of the Eocene to Oligocene White River and late Oligocene to early Miocene Arikaree Formations, which were evidently deposited in a swampy environment [13].
Although the granite obelisk does name the "Arikaree Indian Scouts" Bloody Knife, Bobtailed Bull, and Little Soldier, even this misnames the Sahnish (Arikara) and Little Scout.
in 'Depositional environments, lithostratigraphy, and biostratigraphy of the White River and Arikaree Groups' (eds.).
167-183, in Depositional environments, lithostratigraphy, and biostratigraphy of the White River and Arikaree Groups (Late Eocene to Early Miocene, North America).