Aristophanes

(redirected from Aristophenes)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Ar·is·toph·a·nes

 (ăr′ĭ-stŏf′ə-nēz) 448?-388? bc.
Greek playwright whose comedies, including The Clouds (423) and Lysistrata (411), satirize Athenian society, politics, and philosophy.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Aristophanes

(ˌærɪˈstɒfəˌniːz)
n
(Biography) ?448–?380 bc, Greek comic dramatist, who satirized leading contemporary figures such as Socrates and Euripides. Eleven of his plays are extant, including The Clouds, The Frogs, The Birds, and Lysistrata
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ar•is•toph•a•nes

(ˌær əˈstɒf əˌniz)

n.
448?–385? B.C., Athenian comic playwright.
A•ris•to•phan•ic (əˌrɪs təˈfæn ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aristophanes - an ancient Greek dramatist remembered for his comedies (448-380 BC)Aristophanes - an ancient Greek dramatist remembered for his comedies (448-380 BC)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Aristophanes

[ˌærɪsˈtɒfəniːz] NAristófanes
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Aristophanes

[ˌærɪsˈtɒfəˌniːz] nAristofane m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the award-winning installation from Elena Katsouri on the theme of 'Aristophenes Birds and Kali-Kantzar & Co', and it's certainly worth a visit.
Starting with Aristophenes the sex was explicit and rude.
The critical perception of Aristophenes is transmitted later to the critics like Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Longinus and Plutarch.