Aristotelianism


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Ar·is·to·te·li·an

also Ar·is·to·te·le·an  (ăr′ĭ-stə-tē′lē-ən, -tēl′yən, ə-rĭs′tə-)
adj.
Of or relating to Aristotle or to his philosophy.
n.
1. A follower of Aristotle or his teachings.
2. A person whose thinking and methods tend to be empirical, scientific, or commonsensical.

Ar′is·to·te′li·an·ism n.

Aristotelianism

the philosophy of Aristotle, especially an emphasis upon formal deductive logic, upon the concept that reality is a combination of form and matter, and upon investigation of the concrete and particular. — Aristotelian, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aristotelianism - (philosophy) the philosophy of Aristotle that deals with logic and metaphysics and ethics and poetics and politics and natural scienceAristotelianism - (philosophy) the philosophy of Aristotle that deals with logic and metaphysics and ethics and poetics and politics and natural science; "Aristotelianism profoundly influenced Western thought"
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Translations
Aristotelismus
arisztotelianizmus
arystotelizm

Aristotelianism

[ˌærɪstəˈtiːlɪənɪzəm] Naristotelismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
Abi Talib (600-61); and Aristotle and Aristotelianism among Muslims.
Kesler describes Jaffa as a medieval, and notes that his first book was Tbomism and Aristotelianism, though Jaffa later came to modify his original interpretation of Thomas Aquinas.
MacIntyre identifies such a perspective with his own Thomistic-Aristotelianism, and it is against Williams's own objections to Aristotelianism that MacIntyre sketches his alternative in the book's fourth chapter.
It is fitting that the first chapter is Reisman's study of Avicenna's context, drawing upon the biography of al-Juzjani and Avicenna's so-called autobiography to present his life situation within the developing Aristotelianism of his time and the culture of patronage and learning in the Islamic East.
Mark Moes lays out some of the main lines of the interpretation of Aristotle's notions of phronesis, friendship, and community in the Thomistic Aristotelianism of Alasdair MacIntyre.
Implicit in such arguments, however, is the assumption that the traditional Aristotelianism of arts education was visually meagre.
In a third pairing of essays, Gianni Paganini underlines the radicalism of the text's Aristotelianism, employed to atheist ends, while Marcelino Rodriguez Donis studies the text's reliance on animal intelligence and natural reason to demonstrate that the gods do not exist, that the soul is mortal, and that the powerful have always manipulated religious beliefs to suit their own purposes.
This project will not only contribute to the research on vernacular Aristotelianism funded by an ERC Starting Grant 2013 (ARISTOTLE 335949) and led by Marco Sgarbi but also fill the gap in international studies with a complete analysis of the subject.
It's not a full history of the efforts to understand nature that were made in the centuries before Copernicus shattered Aristotelianism, but a succinct and authoritative summary of the key steps in the path to modern methods and knowledge.
Certainly, those who pick up The Story of Islamic Philosophy might expect a conventional history of the philosophical endeavour in the world of Islam, starting with the translation movement and the appropriation of Aristotelianism and ending with the 'eclipse' of 'rational discourse' in medieval mysticism and obscurantism.
Next up is "Aristotle Versus Religion," by Andrew Bernstein, which offers a concise history of the relationships and conflicts between Aristotelianism and the three major monotheistic religions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
(1) The traditional approach to this issue has been to define Aristotelianism in terms of the circulation of and access to Aristotle's main texts (in particular, the Nicomachean Ethics and the Politics) commencing in the middle of the thirteenth century.