Aristotle


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Ar·is·tot·le

 (ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l) 384-322 bc.
Greek philosopher. A pupil of Plato, the tutor of Alexander the Great, and the author of works on logic, metaphysics, ethics, natural sciences, politics, and poetics, he profoundly influenced Western thought. In his philosophical system, which led him to criticize what he saw as Plato's metaphysical excesses, theory follows empirical observation and logic, based on the syllogism, is the essential method of rational inquiry.

aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
1. a bottle
2. old-fashioned the buttocks or anus
[rhyming slang; in sense 2, shortened from bottle and glass arse]

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Biography) 384–322 bc, Greek philosopher; pupil of Plato, tutor of Alexander the Great, and founder of the Peripatetic school at Athens; author of works on logic, ethics, politics, poetics, rhetoric, biology, zoology, and metaphysics. His works influenced Muslim philosophy and science and medieval scholastic philosophy

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Celestial Objects) a prominent crater in the NW quadrant of the moon about 83 kilometres in diameter

Ar•is•tot•le

(ˈær əˌstɒt l)

n.
384–322 B.C., Greek philosopher: pupil of Plato; tutor of Alexander the Great.

Ar·is·tot·le

(ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l)
384-322 b.c. Greek philosopher and scientist who profoundly influenced Western thought. Aristotle wrote about virtually every area of knowledge, including most of the sciences. Throughout his life he made careful observations, collected specimens, and summarized all the existing knowledge of the natural world. He pioneered the study of zoology, developing a classification system for all animals and making extensive taxonomic studies. His systematic approach later evolved into the basic scientific method in the Western world.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophersAristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophers; pupil of Plato; teacher of Alexander the Great (384-322 BC)
entelechy - (Aristotle) the state of something that is fully realized; actuality as opposed to potentiality
Translations
AristotelesAristotelés
Aristoteles
Aristoteles
Arystoteles

Aristotle

[ˈærɪstɒtl] NAristóteles

Aristotle

nAristoteles m

Aristotle

[ˈærɪˌstɒtl] nAristotele m
References in classic literature ?
The Politics of Aristotle is the second part of a treatise of which the Ethics is the first part.
Plato and Aristotle both accept the view of moral education implied in this answer.
But he does not bind up truth in logical formulae,-- logic is still veiled in metaphysics; and the science which he imagines to "contemplate all truth and all existence" is very unlike the doctrine of the syllogism which Aristotle claims to have discovered.
The extent to which Aristotle or the Aristotelian school were indebted to him in the Politics has been little recognized, and the recognition is the more necessary because it is not made by Aristotle himself.
I proposed that Homer and Aristotle might appear at the head of all their commentators; but these were so numerous, that some hundreds were forced to attend in the court, and outward rooms of the palace.
I then desired the governor to call up Descartes and Gassendi, with whom I prevailed to explain their systems to Aristotle.
Socrates, Aristotle, Galen, were men full of ostentation.
Yet the thought of Aristotle ruled Europe for twelve centuries," Dr.
was Aristotle, as is universally conceded, but the name of its mother
The description of a domestic government founded upon rules directly contrary to those of Aristotle.
March, finding it difficult to become absorbed in his Aristotle after the young couple had gone.
Over conceits of this sort the poor gentleman lost his wits, and used to lie awake striving to understand them and worm the meaning out of them; what Aristotle himself could not have made out or extracted had he come to life again for that special purpose.