Aristotle

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Ar·is·tot·le

 (ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l) 384-322 bc.
Greek philosopher. A pupil of Plato, the tutor of Alexander the Great, and the author of works on logic, metaphysics, ethics, natural sciences, politics, and poetics, he profoundly influenced Western thought. In his philosophical system, which led him to criticize what he saw as Plato's metaphysical excesses, theory follows empirical observation and logic, based on the syllogism, is the essential method of rational inquiry.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
1. a bottle
2. old-fashioned the buttocks or anus
[rhyming slang; in sense 2, shortened from bottle and glass arse]

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Biography) 384–322 bc, Greek philosopher; pupil of Plato, tutor of Alexander the Great, and founder of the Peripatetic school at Athens; author of works on logic, ethics, politics, poetics, rhetoric, biology, zoology, and metaphysics. His works influenced Muslim philosophy and science and medieval scholastic philosophy

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Celestial Objects) a prominent crater in the NW quadrant of the moon about 83 kilometres in diameter
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ar•is•tot•le

(ˈær əˌstɒt l)

n.
384–322 B.C., Greek philosopher: pupil of Plato; tutor of Alexander the Great.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Ar·is·tot·le

(ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l)
384-322 b.c. Greek philosopher and scientist who profoundly influenced Western thought. Aristotle wrote about virtually every area of knowledge, including most of the sciences. Throughout his life he made careful observations, collected specimens, and summarized all the existing knowledge of the natural world. He pioneered the study of zoology, developing a classification system for all animals and making extensive taxonomic studies. His systematic approach later evolved into the basic scientific method in the Western world.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophersAristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophers; pupil of Plato; teacher of Alexander the Great (384-322 BC)
entelechy - (Aristotle) the state of something that is fully realized; actuality as opposed to potentiality
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
AristotelesAristotelés
Aristoteles
Aristoteles
Arystoteles

Aristotle

[ˈærɪstɒtl] NAristóteles
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Aristotle

nAristoteles m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Aristotle

[ˈærɪˌstɒtl] nAristotele m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
We can appreciate Aristotle's critical analysis of constitutions, but find it hard to take seriously his advice to the legislator.
Aristotle's Politics, then, is a handbook for the legislator, the expert who is to be called in when a state wants help.
This is the principle expressed in Aristotle's account of political justice, the principle of "tools to those who can use them." As the aim of the state is differently conceived, the qualifications for government will vary.
Aristotle's mixed constitution springs from a recognition of sectional interests in the state.
Aristotle's failure does not lie in this, that he is both idealist and realist, but that he keeps these two tendencies too far apart.
brother what father of the church is it, who says that the errors of heretics have always had for their lurking place the thickets of Aristotle's metaphysics?
"My friend, the fact was known before Aristotle's days - that is to say, nearly two thousand years ago."
The germs of two valuable principles of education may also be gathered from the 'words of priests and priestesses:' (1) that true knowledge is a knowledge of causes (compare Aristotle's theory of episteme); and (2) that the process of learning consists not in what is brought to the learner, but in what is drawn out of him.
The twelve essays are arranged in three groups, considering in turn Aristotle's theoretical philosophy, his practical philosophy, and his later influence in both areas.
Their topics include the explanatory value of developmental hypotheses as exemplified by the interpretation of Aristotle, the debt of Aristotle s collection of politeiai to the sophistic tradition, Plotinus' criticism of Aristotle's doctrine of primary substance and its background, the early literary construct of Boethius: In Isagogen Porphyrii commenta, editio prima, Ammonius Hermeiou on the appearance of ghosts, and the un-Byzantine Byzantine on two sophisms.
This definitive biography shows that Aristotle's philosophy is best understood on the basis of a firm knowledge of his life and of the school he founded.
Herman offers incisive analysis of Plato's and Aristotle's works and ideas (as well as those of some major successors).