Aristotle

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Related to Aristotlean: Aristotelian philosophy

Ar·is·tot·le

 (ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l) 384-322 bc.
Greek philosopher. A pupil of Plato, the tutor of Alexander the Great, and the author of works on logic, metaphysics, ethics, natural sciences, politics, and poetics, he profoundly influenced Western thought. In his philosophical system, which led him to criticize what he saw as Plato's metaphysical excesses, theory follows empirical observation and logic, based on the syllogism, is the essential method of rational inquiry.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
1. a bottle
2. old-fashioned the buttocks or anus
[rhyming slang; in sense 2, shortened from bottle and glass arse]

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Biography) 384–322 bc, Greek philosopher; pupil of Plato, tutor of Alexander the Great, and founder of the Peripatetic school at Athens; author of works on logic, ethics, politics, poetics, rhetoric, biology, zoology, and metaphysics. His works influenced Muslim philosophy and science and medieval scholastic philosophy

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Celestial Objects) a prominent crater in the NW quadrant of the moon about 83 kilometres in diameter
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ar•is•tot•le

(ˈær əˌstɒt l)

n.
384–322 B.C., Greek philosopher: pupil of Plato; tutor of Alexander the Great.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Ar·is·tot·le

(ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l)
384-322 b.c. Greek philosopher and scientist who profoundly influenced Western thought. Aristotle wrote about virtually every area of knowledge, including most of the sciences. Throughout his life he made careful observations, collected specimens, and summarized all the existing knowledge of the natural world. He pioneered the study of zoology, developing a classification system for all animals and making extensive taxonomic studies. His systematic approach later evolved into the basic scientific method in the Western world.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophersAristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophers; pupil of Plato; teacher of Alexander the Great (384-322 BC)
entelechy - (Aristotle) the state of something that is fully realized; actuality as opposed to potentiality
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
AristotelesAristotelés
Aristoteles
Aristoteles
Arystoteles

Aristotle

[ˈærɪstɒtl] NAristóteles
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Aristotle

nAristoteles m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Aristotle

[ˈærɪˌstɒtl] nAristotele m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
(2.) The old historical view of Caliban as an Aristotlean "natural slave" (epitomized in Frank Kermode's influential introduction to the Arden edition of The Tempest [London: Methuen, 1954], lxii]) was replaced in the last quarter of the twentieth century by the new historicist view memorably presented in Stephen Greenblatt's "Learning to Curse: Aspects of Linguistic Colonialism in the Sixteenth Century," in vol.
This is a material not bound by the conceptual, thereby 'is something impoverished which needs its form.' (33) Yet the contradiction arises that by proposing such unbinding, 'by speaking of matter as an [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], a principle, I have already abstracted from the immediacy of matter itself and reduced it to its most general concept,' (34) shattering its materiality, (35) transforming it into 'knowledge.' To totalize everything as intensive material is the same Aristotlean [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and still 'results from a process of reduction through abstraction' (36) no matter how much we think we escape the concept.
Following attention to practice, one can identify many methodological applications of praxis that appear quite different but owe essentially to the Aristotlean distinction of praxis as meaning arising from doing as a social and ethical act.
The green-fingered among you, should look and smell the herbs of the Aristotlean mountain, which are not only protected by a European Treaty but also flavour the delicious local cuisine.
The former is Aristotlean in approach while the latter Pythogrian.
Inheriting a mistrust and critique of hylomorphism from Gilbert Simondon, Deleuze is critical of the traditional Aristotlean idea of the imposition of form (morphe or eidos) on inert matter (hyle).