Aristotle

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Ar·is·tot·le

 (ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l) 384-322 bc.
Greek philosopher. A pupil of Plato, the tutor of Alexander the Great, and the author of works on logic, metaphysics, ethics, natural sciences, politics, and poetics, he profoundly influenced Western thought. In his philosophical system, which led him to criticize what he saw as Plato's metaphysical excesses, theory follows empirical observation and logic, based on the syllogism, is the essential method of rational inquiry.

aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
1. a bottle
2. old-fashioned the buttocks or anus
[rhyming slang; in sense 2, shortened from bottle and glass arse]

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Biography) 384–322 bc, Greek philosopher; pupil of Plato, tutor of Alexander the Great, and founder of the Peripatetic school at Athens; author of works on logic, ethics, politics, poetics, rhetoric, biology, zoology, and metaphysics. His works influenced Muslim philosophy and science and medieval scholastic philosophy

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Celestial Objects) a prominent crater in the NW quadrant of the moon about 83 kilometres in diameter

Ar•is•tot•le

(ˈær əˌstɒt l)

n.
384–322 B.C., Greek philosopher: pupil of Plato; tutor of Alexander the Great.

Ar·is·tot·le

(ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l)
384-322 b.c. Greek philosopher and scientist who profoundly influenced Western thought. Aristotle wrote about virtually every area of knowledge, including most of the sciences. Throughout his life he made careful observations, collected specimens, and summarized all the existing knowledge of the natural world. He pioneered the study of zoology, developing a classification system for all animals and making extensive taxonomic studies. His systematic approach later evolved into the basic scientific method in the Western world.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophersAristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophers; pupil of Plato; teacher of Alexander the Great (384-322 BC)
entelechy - (Aristotle) the state of something that is fully realized; actuality as opposed to potentiality
Translations
AristotelesAristotelés
Aristoteles
Aristoteles
Arystoteles

Aristotle

[ˈærɪstɒtl] NAristóteles

Aristotle

nAristoteles m

Aristotle

[ˈærɪˌstɒtl] nAristotele m
References in periodicals archive ?
Stick is lavishly exercised on their petal-like body for missing out on homework because according to the Socrates and Aristotles there, more scars on students' body will guarantee more marks in exams.
Speaking to a press conference in Islamabad on Wednesday, the interior minister called Imran Khan 'such Aristotles and Hippocrates that spread despair', claiming that conspiracies have been staged against the national progress.
The Secret History of Emotion: From Aristotles Rhetoric to Modern Brain Science.
Aristotles Theory State: Nature, Function, Criticism and Thought.
Tsikaloudaki (2002), Sustainable development of outdoor spaces in urban environment, Thessaloniki, Greece, Aristotles University of Thessaloniki.
Now, to be delighted at being human, one need not take irrational pride in the achievements of other human beings--the Aristotles, Mozarts, Einsteins, Edisons, Van Goghs, Dostoyevskys or John Glenns and Buz Aldrens, not to mention all the less widely hailed heroes of the world.
Opponents of compulsory voting, especially libertarians, tend to characterise or imagine that voluntary voting results in a world in which only your well-informed Socrateses, Platos and Aristotles trot down to the voting booths.
Case complexity scores in congenital heart surgery: a comparative study of Aristotles Basic Complexity score and Risk Adjustment in Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) system.
Loys Le Roy, Aristotles politiques, or Discourses of gouernment, London, 1598 (Early English Books Online, Cambridge University Library), 53-54.
It does not promise a generation of Aristotles or Newtons, of Napoleons or Washingtons, of Raphaels or Shakespeares, though such miracles of nature it has before now contained within its precincts.
The Platos, Aristotles, Socrates, specifically with regard to the way they mirrored society and spoke of the social political process, have become comedians.
PAVLOS KONTOS, Aristotles Moral Realism Reconsidered: Phenomenological Ethics, New York/London, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group, 2011.