arithmetic progression

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arithmetic progression

n.
A sequence, such as the positive odd integers 1, 3, 5, 7, ... , in which each term after the first is formed by adding a constant to the preceding term.

arithmetic progression

n
(Mathematics) a sequence of numbers or quantities, each term of which differs from the succeeding term by a constant amount, such as 3,6,9,12. Compare geometric progression

arithmet′ic progres′sion


n.
a sequence in which each term is obtained by the addition of a constant number to the preceding term, as 1, 4, 7, 10, and 6, 1, −4, −9. Also called ar′ithmet′ic se′ries.

ar·ith·met·ic progression

(ăr′ĭth-mĕt′ĭk)
A sequence of numbers such as 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 ..., in which each term after the first is formed by adding a constant to the preceding number (in this case, 2). Compare geometric progression.

arithmetic progression

- A sequence in which each term is obtained by the addition of a constant number to the preceding term, as 1, 4, 7, 10, 13.
See also related terms for sequence.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arithmetic progression - (mathematics) a progression in which a constant is added to each term in order to obtain the next termarithmetic progression - (mathematics) a progression in which a constant is added to each term in order to obtain the next term; "1-4-7-10-13- is the start of an arithmetic progression"
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
patterned advance, progression - a series with a definite pattern of advance
References in periodicals archive ?
The juridical cumulation system is in fact the most widespread in contemporary laws, unlike the system of arithmetic series (or the system of adding the penalties) expressed by the Latin adage "quot delicta, tot poenae" or by the absorption system expressed by the adage "Major poena minorem absorbet".
The formula for finding the nth term of arithmetic progression, and the sum of the first n terms of Arithmetic series are available.
These books are part of the Teaching Arithmetic series and co-authored by Marilyn Burns.