arming

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arm1

arm 1

 (ärm)
n.
1. An upper limb of the human body, connecting the hand and wrist to the shoulder.
2. A part similar to a human arm, such as the forelimb of an animal or a long part projecting from a central support in a machine.
3. Something, such as a sleeve on a garment or a support on a chair, that is designed to cover or support the human arm.
4. A relatively narrow extension jutting out from a large mass: an arm of the sea. See Synonyms at branch.
5. An administrative or functional branch, as of an organization.
6. Power or authority: the long arm of the law.
7. Sports The skill of throwing or pitching a ball well.
Idioms:
an arm and a leg Slang
An excessively high price: a cruise that cost an arm and a leg.
arm in arm
With arms linked together: They walked across the beach arm in arm.
at arm's length
At such a distance that physical or social contact is discouraged: kept the newcomer at arm's length at first.
with open arms
With great cordiality and hospitality.

[Middle English, from Old English earm; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

armed (ärmd) adj.

arm 2

 (ärm)
n.
1. A weapon, especially a firearm: troops bearing arms; ICBMs, bombs, and other nuclear arms.
2. A branch of a military force: infantry, armor, and other combat arms.
3. arms
a. Warfare: a call to arms against the invaders.
b. Military service: several million volunteers under arms; the profession of arms.
4. arms
a. Heraldry Bearings.
b. Insignia, as of a state, an official, a family, or an organization.
v. armed, arm·ing, arms
v.intr.
1. To supply or equip oneself with weaponry.
2. To prepare oneself for warfare or conflict.
v.tr.
1. To equip with weapons: armed themselves with loaded pistols; arm a missile with a warhead; arm a nation for war.
2. To equip with what is needed for effective action: tax advisers who were armed with the latest forms.
3. To provide with something that strengthens or protects: a space reentry vehicle that was armed with a ceramic shield.
4. To prepare (a weapon or electronic system, such as an alarm) for use or operation, as by releasing a safety device.
Idiom:
up in arms
Extremely upset; indignant.

[From Middle English armes, weapons, from Old French, pl. of arme, weapon, from Latin arma, weapons; see ar- in Indo-European roots. Verb, Middle English armen, from Old French armer, from Latin armāre, from arma.]

armed (ärmd) adj.
arm′er n.

ARM

abbr.
adjustable-rate mortgage

arming

(ˈɑːmɪŋ)
n
1. the act of taking arms or providing with arms
2. (Nautical Terms) nautical a greasy substance, such as tallow, packed into the recess at the bottom of a sounding lead to pick up samples of sand, gravel, etc, from the bottom

arming

As applied to explosives, weapons, and ammunition, the changing from a safe condition to a state of readiness for initiation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arming - the act of equiping with weapons in preparation for wararming - the act of equiping with weapons in preparation for war
militarisation, militarization, mobilization, mobilisation - act of assembling and putting into readiness for war or other emergency: "mobilization of the troops"
outfitting - the act of renovating and fitting out a ship
rearmament - the act of arming again; "he opposed the rearmament of Japan after World War II"
disarmament, disarming - act of reducing or depriving of arms; "the disarmament of the aggressor nations must be complete"
References in classic literature ?
It was a nasty fog to turn out into, but there were things Silas loved better than his own comfort; so, drawing his pork to the extremity of the hanger, and arming himself with his lantern and his old sack, he set out on what, in ordinary weather, would have been a twenty minutes' errand.
It is, therefore, with the most evident propriety, that the plan of the convention proposes to empower the Union "to provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed in the service of the United States, RESERVING TO THE STATES RESPECTIVELY THE APPOINTMENT OF THE OFFICERS, AND THE AUTHORITY OF TRAINING THE MILITIA ACCORDING TO THE DISCIPLINE PRESCRIBED BY CONGRESS."
The arsenals were opened to Commander Farragut, who hastened the arming of his frigate; but, as it always happens, the moment it was decided to pursue the monster, the monster did not appear.
There never was a new prince who has disarmed his subjects; rather when he has found them disarmed he has always armed them, because, by arming them, those arms become yours, those men who were distrusted become faithful, and those who were faithful are kept so, and your subjects become your adherents.
For their men of war; it is a dangerous state, where they live and remain in a body, and are used to donatives; whereof we see examples in the janizaries, and pretorian bands of Rome; but trainings of men, and arming them in several places, and under several commanders, and without donatives, are things of defence, and no danger.
From the close of the year 1811 intensified arming and concentrating of the forces of Western Europe began, and in 1812 these forces- millions of men, reckoning those transporting and feeding the army- moved from the west eastwards to the Russian frontier, toward which since 1811 Russian forces had been similarly drawn.