Armorican

Ar·mor·ic

 (är-môr′ĭk, -mŏr′-) also Ar·mor·i·can (-ĭ-kən)
adj.
Of or relating to Armorica or its people, language, or culture.
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Armorica.
2. See Breton.

Armorican

(ɑːˈmɒrɪkən)
n
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Armorica
adj
(Placename) of or relating to Armorica
References in periodicals archive ?
A large volcanic explosion or seismic ruptures somewhere out of the Baltoscandian shelf, for example in the Armorican volcanic arc, could also have caused earthquakes with potential tsunamis to travel deep into the Baltoscandian shelf sea.
Sometime between the Roman victories over the Armorican Gauls in 56 BC and the invasion of Britain in AD 43, the island fell under control of the Empire, and just the relative quantity of Roman finds suggests that Guernsey may have been more Romanized, or Romanized earlier, than neighboring Jersey.
16) shown that high correlation between the parameters b and |[delta][V.sub.int]| as a rule is displayed in the mountain areas of the Alps, the Pyrenees, and some tectonic structures: the Armorican Massif in southwestern France, in the Rhine shale mountains (Rhenish Massif) and tectonic zone Teisseyre-Tornquist (Tornquist-Teisseyre fault system).
In Europe, the Variscan belt represents an important metallogenic province for these two types of rare-metal deposits, which are located mainlyin the Bohemian Massif, the Iberian Massif, Cornwall, the Armorican Massif, and the French Massif Central (FMC).
The text also asserts that during the Roman period a group of Britons left the island and settled on the continent, becoming the Armorican Britons or Bretons of Brittany, northern France.
The composition of sand and pebbles indicates that they come from erosion of Triassic deposits of the Tabular Cover and the Ordovician Armorican Quartzites of the Iberian Massif.
In the central western part of the Iberian Peninsula, the species grows on siliceous rocks, either granites (Sierras de Bejar, Tormantos and la Estrella) or Armorican quartzes from the Silurian and Devonian (Sierra de Francia).
Fatka and Mergl provide an overview of the complex evolution of terrane terminology, and argue, largely on the basis of faunal evidence, for the existence of Perunica as a microcontinent that is separate from the Armorican Terrane Assemblage throughout the Ordovician.