Arnold


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Ar·nold

 (är′nəld), Benedict 1741-1801.
American Revolutionary general and traitor whose plan to surrender West Point to the British for 20,000 pounds was foiled when his accomplice John André was captured (1780). Arnold fled to New York and then to England (1781).

Arnold

, Matthew 1822-1888.
British poet and critic whose poems, such as "Dover Beach" (1867), express moral and religious doubts. His Culture and Anarchy (1869) is a polemic against Victorian materialism.

Arnold

, Thomas 1795-1842.
British educator and historian who as headmaster of Rugby School (1828-1842) introduced classes in mathematics, modern languages, and modern history into the classical curriculum.

Arnold

(ˈɑːnəld)
n
(Placename) a town in N central England, in S Nottinghamshire. Pop: 37 402 (2001)

Arnold

(ˈɑːnəld)
n
1. (Biography) Sir Malcolm. 1921–2006, English composer, esp of orchestral works in a traditional idiom
2. (Biography) Matthew. 1822–88, English poet, essayist, and literary critic, noted particularly for his poems Sohrab and Rustum (1853) and Dover Beach (1867), and for his Essays in Criticism (1865) and Culture and Anarchy (1869)
3. (Biography) his father, Thomas. 1795–1842, English historian and educationalist, headmaster of Rugby School, noted for his reforms in public-school education

Ar•nold

(ˈɑr nld)

n.
1. Benedict, 1741–1801, American general in the Revolutionary War who became a traitor.
2. Matthew, 1822–88, English poet and literary critic.
3. his father, Thomas, 1795–1842, English clergyman, educator, and historian.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Arnold - English poet and literary critic (1822-1888)Arnold - English poet and literary critic (1822-1888)
2.Arnold - United States general and traitor in the American RevolutionArnold - United States general and traitor in the American Revolution; in 1780 his plan to surrender West Point to the British was foiled (1741-1801)
Translations
Arnold
Arnold
Arnaud
Arnold
Arnold
References in classic literature ?
Arnold answered it, without the slightest hesitation; speaking with an unaffected modesty and simplicity which at once won Sir Patrick's heart.
My story," continued the pleasant old man, with a charming frankness which leveled all differences of age and rank between Arnold and himself, "is not entirely unlike yours; though I
Before Arnold could reply Blanche called to him from the lawn.
When Blanche's eyes turned on Arnold after her uncle had gone out, not even the hideous fashionable disfigurements of the inflated "chignon" and the tilted hat could destroy the triple charm of youth, beauty, and tenderness beaming in her face.
A sudden timidity seized on Arnold exactly at the wrong moment.
She could have boxed Arnold on both ears for being so unreasonably afraid of her.
Arnold was born in 1822, the son--and this is decidedly significant--of the Dr.
As a poet Arnold is generally admitted to rank among the Victorians next after Tennyson and Browning.
In fact, the invincible courage of the thoroughly disciplined spirit in the midst of doubt and external discouragement has never been, more nobly expressed than by Arnold in such poems as 'Palladium' and (from a different point of view) 'The Last Word.
For them Arnold had sincere theoretical sympathy (though his temperament made it impossible for him to enter into the same sort of personal sympathy with them as did Ruskin); but their whole environment and conception of life seemed to him hideous.
It has indeed for its basis a very wide range of knowledge, acquired by intellectual processes, but this knowledge alone Arnold readily admitted to be 'machinery.
Toward democracy Arnold took, not Carlyle's attitude of definite opposition, but one of questioning scrutiny.