Arnold

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Ar·nold

 (är′nəld), Benedict 1741-1801.
American Revolutionary general and traitor whose plan to surrender West Point to the British for 20,000 pounds was foiled when his accomplice John André was captured (1780). Arnold fled to New York and then to England (1781).

Arnold

, Matthew 1822-1888.
British poet and critic whose poems, such as "Dover Beach" (1867), express moral and religious doubts. His Culture and Anarchy (1869) is a polemic against Victorian materialism.

Arnold

, Thomas 1795-1842.
British educator and historian who as headmaster of Rugby School (1828-1842) introduced classes in mathematics, modern languages, and modern history into the classical curriculum.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Arnold

(ˈɑːnəld)
n
(Placename) a town in N central England, in S Nottinghamshire. Pop: 37 402 (2001)

Arnold

(ˈɑːnəld)
n
1. (Biography) Sir Malcolm. 1921–2006, English composer, esp of orchestral works in a traditional idiom
2. (Biography) Matthew. 1822–88, English poet, essayist, and literary critic, noted particularly for his poems Sohrab and Rustum (1853) and Dover Beach (1867), and for his Essays in Criticism (1865) and Culture and Anarchy (1869)
3. (Biography) his father, Thomas. 1795–1842, English historian and educationalist, headmaster of Rugby School, noted for his reforms in public-school education
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ar•nold

(ˈɑr nld)

n.
1. Benedict, 1741–1801, American general in the Revolutionary War who became a traitor.
2. Matthew, 1822–88, English poet and literary critic.
3. his father, Thomas, 1795–1842, English clergyman, educator, and historian.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Arnold - English poet and literary critic (1822-1888)Arnold - English poet and literary critic (1822-1888)
2.Arnold - United States general and traitor in the American RevolutionArnold - United States general and traitor in the American Revolution; in 1780 his plan to surrender West Point to the British was foiled (1741-1801)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Arnold
Arnold
Arnaud
Arnold
Arnold
References in classic literature ?
Arnold answered it, without the slightest hesitation; speaking with an unaffected modesty and simplicity which at once won Sir Patrick's heart.
I shall call you 'Arnold.' You mus'n't return the compliment and call me 'Patrick,' mind--I'm too old to be treated in that way.
My story," continued the pleasant old man, with a charming frankness which leveled all differences of age and rank between Arnold and himself, "is not entirely unlike yours; though I am old enough to be your grandfather.
"I have one friend at Windygates," said Arnold. "He came here this morning, like you.
Arnold artlessly accepted the words as an appeal to him for information.
"The value I set on my life?" repeated Arnold. "I set a high value on it, of course!"
MATTHEW ARNOLD. Contemporary with Carlyle and Ruskin and fully worthy to rank with them stands still a third great preacher of social and spiritual regeneration, Matthew Arnold, whose personality and message, however, were very different from theirs and who was also one of the chief Victorian poets.
As a poet Arnold is generally admitted to rank among the Victorians next after Tennyson and Browning.
In substance Arnold's poetry is the expression of his long and tragic spiritual struggle.
The exaggerated pessimism in this part of his outcry is explained by his own statement, that he lived in a transition time, when the old faith was (as he held) dead, and the new one (partly realized in our own generation) as yet 'powerless to be born.' Arnold's poetry, therefore, is to be viewed as largely the expression, monotonous but often poignantly beautiful, of a temporary mood of questioning protest.
There is a striking contrast (largely expressing an actual change of spirit and point of view) between the manner of Arnold's poetry and that of his prose.
'The Populace,' the 'vast raw and half-developed residuum.' For them Arnold had sincere theoretical sympathy (though his temperament made it impossible for him to enter into the same sort of personal sympathy with them as did Ruskin); but their whole environment and conception of life seemed to him hideous.