arsenate

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ar·se·nate

 (är′sə-nĭt, -nāt′)
n.
A salt, ester, or anion of arsenic acid.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

arsenate

(ˈɑːsəˌneɪt; -nɪt) or

arseniate

n
(Elements & Compounds) a salt or ester of arsenic acid, esp a salt containing the ion A5O43–
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ar•se•nate

(ˈɑr səˌneɪt, -nɪt)

n.
a salt or ester of arsenic acid.
[1790–1800]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·se·nate

(är′sə-nĭt, är′sə-nāt′)
A chemical compound containing the group AsO4.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arsenate - a salt or ester of arsenic acid
salt - a compound formed by replacing hydrogen in an acid by a metal (or a radical that acts like a metal)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Arsenic is a metalloid existing in more than 200 diverse structures whereby 60% are arsenates, sulphosalts, sulfides, arsenide, oxides, and arsenide.
The arsenates (Na2HAsO4.7H2O) are thermodynamically considered to be more stable than the arsenites in underground and oxygenated fresh water systems (Irgolic 1982; Cui and Liu 1988).
Environmental forms include arsenious acids, arsenic acids, arsenites, arsenates, methylarsenic acid (MAA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), trimethyl arsine oxide (TMAO), and so forth [1-3].
Although arsenic has been classified at the top of the priority list of the most hazardous substances [3, 4], the crystal structures and the solubility as well as the thermodynamic properties of numerous arsenates remain poorly determined.
The most common oxidation state for arsenic is -3 (arsenide), +3 (arsenates (III) or arsenites, and most organoarsenic compounds) and +5 (arsentate (V) : the most stable inorganic arsenic oxy-compound.
The mineralogical fame of the Bou Azzer district is founded on its extensive suite of rare and colorful arsenates, and especially on its superlative macro-specimens of erythrite, roselite, roselitebeta and wendwilsonite.
Until recent years, about 3 x 107 kg/year of arsenic was applied to crops, as arsenates of Ca, Cu, Pb and Na.
The exact form in which Cr is leached is unclear, but it has been suggested to be leachable by itself as Cr(VI) and in the form of various Cr arsenates (Pizzi 1990a, 1990b).
The fast fixation rate for CCA-B is attributed to the low initial Cr content in the solution, relatively low pH, and the presence of a high arsenic content to react with and precipitate the reduced chromium as chromium arsenates. Even though CCA type A had a higher chromium content in its initial solution, its fixation rate was faster than for CCA type C probably due to its initial low pH.
The most prevalent arsenic-bearing compounds in minerals are arsenates. These compounds strongly bind to several common minerals, so they don't typically dissolve into waters flowing through underground reservoirs, says Ronald S.
He felt that the results indicated that industries that release toxic arsenates might better be located in tropical climates where plant life in the ocean is equipped to handle such contaminants.
Being eager collectors of phosphates and arsenates, we were especially fascinated by the excellent mine maps and the "lugar" site maps.