arsenite

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arsenite

(ˈɑːsɪˌnaɪt)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a salt or ester of arsenous acid, esp a salt containing the ion A5O33–
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References in periodicals archive ?
The arsenates (Na2HAsO4.7H2O) are thermodynamically considered to be more stable than the arsenites in underground and oxygenated fresh water systems (Irgolic 1982; Cui and Liu 1988).
Inorganic As is mostly present in arsenite [trivalent {As(III)}] and arsenate [pentavalent {As(V)}] forms.
Environmental forms include arsenious acids, arsenic acids, arsenites, arsenates, methylarsenic acid (MAA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), trimethyl arsine oxide (TMAO), and so forth [1-3].
Most plants take up arsenic as arsenate [73] since arsenite is unstable as it gets oxidized to arsenate by biochemical processes in the soil system.
Over 200 different mineral forms of arsenic occur, of which Arsenates are about 60%, sulfides and sulfosalts make 20%, and arsenides, arsenites, oxides, silicates, and elemental arsenic make the remaining 20% [3,4].
In natural water, arsenic exists as inorganic arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)).
The toxicity of as varies with its chemical forms Arsines and arsenites are more toxic than As in the higher oxidation states.
* arsenates or inorganic pentavalent compounds-somewhat less toxic than arsenites
Arsenic-As Organic: methylarsonic & dimethylarsinic acids and others Inorganic: trivalent (arsenite), pentavalent (arsenate) References
Problems arise when chemical reactions change the arsenates into arsenites, which don't bind tightly to other minerals and can therefore enter the underground water supply.
Evidence is now mounting that organic matter and the microbes it feeds may be playing a role in the formation of arsenites in aquifers.
Inorganic as generally is more toxic and mobile than organoarsenic species, while trivalent arsenite [As(III)] is considered to be more toxic, soluble, and mobile than pentavalent arsenate [As(V)] [3].