Temple of Artemis

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Temple of Artemis

n
(Placename) the large temple at Ephesus, on the W coast of Asia Minor: one of the Seven Wonders of the World
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Temple of Artemis - a large temple at Ephesus that was said to be one of the seven wonders of the ancient world
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tweens are shown the famous bronze statue of Artemision Bronze to inspire their lightning throwing pose.
The head of Zeus, for example, seems to be a version of the head of the fifth-century BCE bronze god found in the sea off Cape Artemision, Greece, with his locks shortened to their end curls, and his face puffier, as befits someone in childbirth, but with the same stem nose and lips, the same almond-curved eyes.
Atriplici halimi-Artemisietum arborescentis Biondi 1988 (1-19) (Artemision arborescentis, Salsolo-Peganetalia, Pegano-Salsoletea) Matthiola incana subsp.
Lysimachos forced the inhabitants of Ephesos to move to a new city, Arsinoeia, which was physically separated from the Artemision. According to Rogers, the forced resettling of the Ephesians was not unique and was done for military, political, and climatic reasons.
In ancient Greece, small bronze figures were produced from the eighth century BCE, and there are spectacular pieces dating from the classical period (for instance, the Artemision Bronze depicting Zeus or Poseidon in the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Greece, and the so-called Riace Warriors in the Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia in Reggio Calabria, Italy).
The Archaic hairstyle is reminiscent of the same handling carried over in the famous Early Classical Greek bronze Zeus or Poseidon of Artemision in the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.
The dedication would be analogous to Croesus's sponsorship at the Artemision of Ephesos.