arterial blood gas

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arterial blood gas

n.
The concentration of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, whose partial pressures are measured along with other factors such as blood pH in order to assess oxygen saturation and other metabolic indicators in patients, especially those with respiratory disorders.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Necessary adjustments were performed according to arterial blood gas analysis. After the patients could spontaneously breathe, the mechanical respiratory rate was reduced by 8 and 4 sequentially.
All patients who were subjected to EMGdi and classical parameters such as spirometry parameters, arterial blood gas analysis, COPD assessment test (CAT) score, and the modified early warning score (MEWS) in outpatient department, would be treated effectively in the outpatient or inpatient settings according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guideline.
Respiratory function tests, pulse oximetry readings, arterial blood gas analysis, electrocardiography, non-stress test were normal.
Arterial blood gas analysis done during follow-up in intensive care showed pH: 6.79, Pa[O.sub.2]: 45 mmHg, PaC[O.sub.2]: 55 mmHg, HC[O.sub.3]: 7.9 mmol/L, and BE: -33.6 mmol/L.
Peripheral venous and arterial blood gas analysis in adults: are they comparable?
Isosulfan blue stain-induced methemoglobinemia was diagnosed based on knowledge of the use of the stain due to the characteristics of the surgical procedure, the high methemoglobin concentration both in arterial blood gas analysis and in further biochemical blood analysis, and the decrease in Sp[O.sub.2] saturation regardless of normal Pa[O.sub.2].
Arterial blood gas analysis revealed pH 6.9, PaC[O.sub.2] 38.1 mmHg, Pa[O.sub.2] 54 mmHg, HC[O.sub.3]: 8 mmol/L, and baz excess (BE) -1.7 mmol/L.
Arterial blood gas analysis worsened over the next day due to hypoxemia (arterial p[O.sub.2] was <60 mmHg) and he was intubated.
To monitor for this, our patient had bilateral radial arterial access with arterial blood gas analysis from each.
Arterial blood gas analysis was performed at induction through an arterial line inserted in radial artery, 15 minutes after performing pneumoperitoneum and each 20 minutes after that until the end of operation.
The number of patients in which main indication for arterial line insertion was continuous arterial blood gas analysis and continuous blood pressure monitoring were same between the two groups (Table 1).