Griffith

(redirected from Arthur Griffith)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Arthur Griffith: Eoin MacNeill

Grif·fith

 (grĭf′ĭth), Arthur 1872-1922.
Irish nationalist leader who was a founder of the Sinn Fein movement for Irish independence (1905). He led the Irish delegation that negotiated the 1921 treaty with England that established the Irish Free State.

Griffith

(ˈɡrɪfɪθ)
n
1. (Biography) Arthur. 1872–1922, Irish journalist and nationalist: founder of Sinn Féin (1905); president of the Free State assembly (1922)
2. (Biography) D(avid Lewelyn) W(ark). 1875–1948, US film director and producer. He introduced several cinematic techniques, including the flashback and the fade-out, in his masterpiece The Birth of a Nation (1915)

Grif•fith

(ˈgrɪf ɪθ)

n.
D(avid Lewelyn) W(ark), 1875–1948, U.S. film director and producer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Griffith - United States film maker who was the first to use flashbacks and fade-outs (1875-1948)
References in periodicals archive ?
MICHAEL Collins and Arthur Griffith have been remembered at their annual commemoration at Dublin's Glasnevin Cemetery.
But what makes it even more fascinating is the way the fictional characters cross paths with historical figures like Collins (Drea), British spymaster general Ormonde Winter (Paul Ritter) and Sinn Fein founder Arthur Griffith (Andrew Bennett).
1905: The Irish political party Sinn Fein was founded in Dublin by Arthur Griffith.
1905: The Irish political party Sinn Fein was founded in Dublin by Arthur Griffith. 1919: Viscountess (Nancy) Astor became Britain's first woman MP, holding a safe Plymouth seat for the Tories in a by-election caused by her husband's elevation of the peerage.
1905: The Irish political party Sinn Fein was founded in Dublin by Arthur Griffith. 1934: Winston Churchill warned that weak defences could mean that Britain could be "tortured into absolute subjection" in any war with Germany.
ARTHUR GRIFFITH, the focus of this detailed biography by Owen McGee, has been a somewhat neglected figure in the historiography of Ireland in the late-nineteenth-and early twentieth-centuries.
Other events unique to Sligo that were of national significance and are covered in detail (or as much detail as the concise format of the series allows for) include the first use of PR in an Irish election in the case of Sligo Corporation in 1919, the IRA's unsuccessful effort to prevent Arthur Griffith from delivering a crucial election address in Sligo town in April 1922 that might well have ignited the Civil War, and the shooting dead of six republicans including Eoin MacNeill's son Brian - by the National Army on Benbulben in September 1922.
Newspapers like the Limerick Leader and the Irish Independent supported the boycott, as did Arthur Griffith, the future founder of the pro-Republican Sinn Fein political party.
1905: The Irish political party Sinn Fein was founded in Dublin by Arthur Griffith. 1919: Viscountess (Nancy) Astor became Britain's first woman MP to take up a Commons seat, holding a safe Plymouth seat for the Tories in a by-election.
By the time he became Minister for Public Works in the first Labor government in New South Wales in 1910 Arthur Griffith (1862-1946) (1) had seen the evolution of a system of compulsory industrial arbitration and totally supported it.
Sinn Fein was an amalgamation of groups founded by Arthur Griffith and Bulmer Hobson.
(29) Inspired by Hungary's successful challenge to the Austrian Empire, Arthur Griffith (1872-1922) planted the seeds of Hungarian rebellion in Irish soil, defining the tenets of Irish nationalism.