Rackham

(redirected from Arthur Rackham)
Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Rack·ham

 (răk′əm), Arthur 1867-1939.
British artist known for his dreamlike illustrations for children's books.

Rackham

(ˈrækəm)
n
(Biography) Arthur. 1867–1939, English artist, noted for his book illustrations, esp of fairy tales
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
He will also look at some of the giants of the 'golden age' such as Arthur Rackham, best known for his illustrations for classic fiction and children's literature and Edmund Dulac, the French-born, British-naturalised magazine and book illustrator.
The bewitching town was first illustrated by Arthur Rackham in 1928.
Her work is inspired by her love of Victoriana and is directly influenced by the golden-age illustrators such as Arthur Rackham and Sir John Tennial.
and drawings celebrating Alice in Wonderland by Mervyn Peake, Ralph Steadman, Leonard Weisgard, Arthur Rackham, Peter Blake and Salvador Dali.
As well as works by the author, Alice in Wonderland includes illustrations and drawings by Mabel Lucie Attwell, Peter Blake, Mervyn Peake, Ralph Steadman, Leonard Weisgard, Arthur Rackham, Salvador Dali and others.
The human lovers looked handsome in their Edwardian off-to-play-tennis linens and lace, while in the supernatural realm, Oberon and Tytania (her complex coloratura well-handled by soprano Suzanne Rigden) glittered in blue and black sequins, and the undulating, ever-moving boy fairies of the chorus could have come straight out of an Arthur Rackham print.
The scene is only a seed of thought: "Thus a moment of desire in seeing an Arthur Rackham illustration of Norse mythology led Lewis to become an expert in Norse mythology.
Kershaw admires different ceramic work, but she is perhaps more inspired and influenced by illustrators, especially children's book illustrators, such as Dave McKean, Arthur Rackham and Edward Gorey.
Most people have heard of the great Arthur Rackham, an illustrator who seemed to have one foot in the fairy world, and whose illustrations for Peter Pan are generally seen as the finest examples of the genre.
Mike explains: "Children's classics like Alice in Wonderland, Wind in the Willows, Peter Pan and Winnie-the-Pooh are remembered often as much for their illustrations as they are for their stories, while other artists such as Arthur Rackham, Edmund Dulac, E.
Kusama's self-identification with Alice perhaps explains what distinguishes this beautiful example of book art from the many other attempts to add pictures to Dodgson's words--from Sir John Tenniel's original designs to the painterly approach of Salvador Dali or the skilled draftsmanship of Arthur Rackham.
Other illustrators included Arthur Rackham and Kate Greenaway.