articulatory loop

articulatory loop

n
(Psychology) psychol a short-term memory system that enables a person to remember short strings of words by rehearsing them repeatedly in his head
References in periodicals archive ?
Short term forgetting and the articulatory loop. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 34A, 53-60.
Exploring the articulatory loop. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 36, 233-252.
Baddeley (1986, 1992) describes WM as a limited capacity central executive system that interacts with a set of two passive store systems used for temporary storage of different classes of information: the speech-based articulatory loop, and the visual sketch pad.
Exploring the articulatory loop. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 36, 233-252.
Second, it was shown that there was no ISE under conditions of articulatory suppression -- a finding consistent with the hypothesis that lipread items must pass through the articulatory loop prior to entry to the store.
In order to account for these results, Baddeley & Hitch (1974) and Baddeley (1986) introduced the idea of an articulatory loop, more recently a phonological loop (Baddeley, 1990), as a part of a broader conceptualization of short-term memory that they called working memory.
According to Eysenck, worry affects tasks which impose demands on the capacity of working memory, mainly via the central executive, and, to a lesser degree, the articulatory loop. Anxiety affects the performance of such tasks by pre-empting some of the resources available in the working memory system; the more difficult the task, the greater the demands made upon the resources of working memory.
In short-term verbal memory, information about serial order is thought to be maintained by a phonological system and an articulatory loop. Burgess & Hitch (1992) have pointed out that one of the major functions of this system is the preservation of order, even if accounts of how serial order is maintained in such a system do not explain order errors in verbal recall.
The time limited basis of the articulatory loop provides a natural explanation for the word length effect (Baddeley, Thomson & Buchanan, 1975); the inverse relationship between span and the articulatory duration of stimuli.
Studies of short-term memory for written or spoken information have suggested that suppression disrupts a temporary phonological store known as the articulatory loop (Baddeley, 1986; Baddeley & Hitch, 1974).
Verbal speech-based information is dealt with by the articulatory loop, whilst visuospatial material is manipulated and stored using a specialized system known as the visuospatial scratchpad or sketchpad (VSSP).
The articulatory loop system is specialized for processing verbal material and is composed of two subsystems: a phonological store and an articulatory rehearsal process.