working memory

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working memory

n.
1. A portion of digital memory reserved for data to be temporarily stored during the running of a program. Also called working storage.
2. The part of the mind that stores and manipulates information in the short term and is responsible for planning and carrying out behavior.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

working memory

n
(Psychology) psychol the current contents of a person's consciousness
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.working memory - memory for intermediate results that must be held during thinking
remembering, memory - the cognitive processes whereby past experience is remembered; "he can do it from memory"; "he enjoyed remembering his father"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, Chincotta & Hoosain demonstrated that articulatory suppression had consistently reliable effects in eliminating between-language digit span differences for both balanced and asymmetric bilinguals.
In a series of studies of short-term memory for discrete actions, Smyth & Pendleton (1989, 1990) have shown that performing a motor task during the rehearsal interval reduces the memory span in a way comparable to the effect of articulatory suppression on the memory span for verbal items.
(1986) the visuospatial Manikin test was disrupted by concurrent hand movement but was not disrupted by an equivalent verbal task known as articulatory suppression, which involves repeating an irrelevant spoken word.
A common technique for this is to use articulatory suppression. In this technique reading is performed whilst repeating redundant words such as saying THE THE THE...
If this interpretation is accepted as plausible, then one must also doubt the validity of comparing articulatory suppression to tracking.
Indeed, these authors showed that irrelevant speech and articulatory suppression affect the serial recall aspect of the running task independently of the number of updates that had to b made in young adults.
Regarding children with ASD, some results of studies have shown the possibility that efficient use of inner speech on cognitive control is impaired, on the grounds that articulatory suppression does not affect their performance of cognitive planning tasks such as the Tower of Hanoi (ToH) or Tower of London (ToL) (see, for a review, [8, 9]).
The main task was accompanied by a secondary task of articulatory suppression, which interferes with the verbal rehearsal of the letters.
We have already seen that articulatory suppression does not suppress the auditory store, so it is likely in reading that when the articulatory component of the phonological loop is engaged, the auditory component is working too.
With Baddeley and Hitch's working memory model (1974; Baddeley, 2000) in mind, they provided evidence of central executive involvement, demonstrating that tasks interfering with the articulatory loop component of working memory (articulatory suppression and irrelevant speech) impaired only the order component of the updating performance, but did not damage the updating component.
In addition, the participants also performed an articulatory suppression task.
EXPERIMENT 4: VERBAL INTERFERENCE (ARTICULATORY SUPPRESSION)