aspartame

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as·par·tame

 (ăs′pər-tām′, ə-spär′-)
n.
An artificial sweetener, C14H18N2O5, whose metabolic breakdown products include aspartic acid and phenylalanine. It must be avoided by people with phenylketonuria.

[aspart(ic acid) + (phenyl)a(lanine) + m(ethyl) + e(ster).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aspartame

(əˈspɑːˌteɪm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) an artificial sweetener produced from aspartic acid. Formula: C14H18N2O5
[C20: from aspart(ic acid) + (phenyl)a(lanine) m(ethyl) e(ster)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

as•par•tame

(əˈspɑr teɪm, æˈspɑr-, ˈæs pərˌteɪm)

n.
a white crystalline powder, C14H18N2O5, synthesized from amino acids, that is many times sweeter than sucrose and is used as a low-calorie sugar substitute.
[1970–75; aspart(yl phenyl)a(lanine) m(ethyl) e(ster)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aspartame - an artificial sweetener made from aspartic acidaspartame - an artificial sweetener made from aspartic acid; used as a calorie-free sweetener
sweetener, sweetening - something added to foods to make them taste sweeter
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

as·par·tame

n. aspartamo, dulcificante artificial de baja caloría.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

aspartame

n aspartame m, aspartamo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
High Intensity Artificial Sweetener Bears the Brunt of Controversies, yet Favorable Approvals and Studies Boost Integrity
Summary: High Intensity Artificial Sweetener Bears the Brunt of Controversies, yet Favorable Approvals and Studies Boost Integrity
"After chronic exposure to a diet that contained the artificial sweetener sucralose, we saw that animals began eating a lot more," said lead researcher and Associate Professor Greg Neely from the University of Sydney's Faculty of Science.
Global artificial sweetener market is projected to reach 2.70 billion USD in 2024 by registering a CAGR of 3.7% during the forecasted period (2019-2024).
Last August, research firm Nielsen reported that stevia sales in the US alone had grown 11.9 per cent year over year, while artificial sweetener sales were down an average of 6.6 per cent.
Other studies raised fears that increased artificial sweetener consumption could increase cancer risk, but there was no such link found in the review.
Researchers who analyzed 37 studies that included more than 400,000 people have found a link between artificial sweetener consumption, weight gain, and a higher risk of chronic diseases.
Sodium cyclamate is used as an artificial sweetener in many foods, beverages as well as medicines due to its odorless nature and solubility in water, propylene glycol and alcohol.
They found that of 100 patients with antibody-confirmed Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), 53 reported using the equivalent of 3.5 packets of artificial sweetener per day--mostly aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet) or sucralose (Splenda)--as estimated from a questionnaire about their daily intake of sugar-free foods.
There is some ongoing debate over whether artificial sweetener usage poses a health threat .This review article aims to cover the health benefits and risks of consuming artificial sweeteners and discusses natural sweeteners which can be used as alternatives.