Asa Gray


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Noun1.Asa Gray - United States botanist who specialized in North American flora and who was an early supporter of Darwin's theories of evolution (1810-1888)Asa Gray - United States botanist who specialized in North American flora and who was an early supporter of Darwin's theories of evolution (1810-1888)
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Asa Gray those of the United States, and the result was as I anticipated.
B&B WITH A G&T To celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Apex Waterloo Place Hotel building in Edinburgh, a bespoke gin has been created, inspired by the history of the street and one of the hotel's most famous guests, worldrenowned botanist Asa Gray.
He relates the story of John Bartram's appointment as royal botanist for British colonial Florida in 1764; the discoveries of his son William and his students, who founded Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences; the first major scientific expedition to Spanish Florida by William Maclure, George Ord, Thomas Say, and Titan Peale in 1817; and the work of Academy members and correspondents like Louis Agassiz, John James Audubon, Asa Gray, Clarence Moore, Francis Harper, Henry Fowler, Ernest Hemingway, Charles Chaplin, and Henry Pilsbry.
Asa Gray (1810-1888), the American naturalist wrote of Endlicher's naming a genus for a recently deceased person.
This includes the pantheon of American philosophical, literary, and scientific thinkers, including Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Bronson Alcott and his daughter Louisa May, and Harvard botanist Asa Gray, who became the book's most notable American champion.
En 2008 obtuvo el premio Asa Gray, que es el maximo galardon norteamericano en materia de botanica sistematica.
For her own research, Gilbert delved into the writings of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray, and other great naturalists of the time--and, to get a sense of the common parlance, she pored over the correspondence of scientists who rattled off informal letters the way we send emails.
Asa Gray, dean of 19th-century botanists, that smelling a sumac from as far as 20 feet away spreads infection was in error, however.