asbo


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as·bo

 (ăz′bō)
n. pl. as·bos
1. Chiefly British A court order barring a person who has engaged in certain harassing, menacing, endangering, or violent behaviors from persisting in those behaviors.
2. Chiefly British Slang
a. A person who has been issued one of these orders.
b. A person who is rude, unruly, or disruptive.

[A(nti-)S(ocial) B(ehaviour) O(rder).]

ASBO

(ˈæzˌbəʊ)
n acronym for
1. (Law) anti-social behaviour order: a civil order made against a persistently anti-social individual which restricts his or her activities or movements, a breach of which results in criminal charges
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) anti-social behaviour order: a civil order made against a persistently anti-social individual which restricts his or her activities or movements, a breach of which results in criminal charges
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References in periodicals archive ?
Whatever the measure, and some still argue the ASBO has its place, the public will judge success by results.
Ben Cauchi, above, who currently lives in Liverpool but previously lived at Longfellow Gardens, Graig y Rhacca, was given a two-year Asbo at Caerphilly Magistrates' Court.
ALASTAIR CRAIG canvasses opinion HOME Secretary Theresa May has announced plans to scrap anti-social behaviour orders (Asbos).
Recently, a man on TV was insisting people could be trained to minimise the chance of Asbo kids being provoked.
He said it was important to note that Asbos were not a sign of success and local partnerships aim to put in place interventions that stop problem-atic behaviour before the matter escalates to the stage where an Asbo is required.
"Youths engaging in that sort of behaviour are not in any way going to be deterred by something like an ASBO, there needs to be criminal sanctions against them."
But the system has failed too many times, with an Asbo too often being seen as a badge of honour by too many scumbags.
ALMOST a third of Asbos in Northern Ireland have been broken, it emerged yesterday.
LABOUR launched an effort to save anti-social behaviour orders (Asbos) today, accusing the Government of lacking the commitment to tackle crime and disorder.
But this week, the Home Secretary Theresa May sounded the death knell for the Asbo after new official statistics showed breaches of the orders had risen above 50%, and that their use has fallen to the lowest level yet.
Councillors hope it sends out a clear message to the community that the so-called yob culture will no longer be tolerated - and that teenagers who flout their ASBO will be firmly dealt with.