asceticism

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Related to Ascetic practices: asceticism, Ascetics

as·cet·i·cism

 (ə-sĕt′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The principles and practices of an ascetic; extreme self-denial and austerity.
2. The doctrine that the ascetic life releases the soul from bondage to the body and permits union with the divine.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

asceticism

(əˈsɛtɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the behaviour, discipline, or outlook of an ascetic, esp of a religious ascetic
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the principles of ascetic practices, esp in the early Christian Church
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the theory and system of ascetic practices
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

asceticism

a severe self-deprivation for ethical, religious, or intellectual ends. — ascetic, n., adj.
See also: Behavior
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asceticism - the doctrine that through renunciation of worldly pleasures it is possible to achieve a high spiritual or intellectual stateasceticism - the doctrine that through renunciation of worldly pleasures it is possible to achieve a high spiritual or intellectual state
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
2.asceticism - the trait of great self-denial (especially refraining from worldly pleasures)asceticism - the trait of great self-denial (especially refraining from worldly pleasures)
self-denial, self-discipline - the trait of practicing self discipline
monasticism - asceticism as a form of religious life; usually conducted in a community under a common rule and characterized by celibacy and poverty and obedience
3.asceticism - rigorous self-denial and active self-restraintasceticism - rigorous self-denial and active self-restraint
self-control, self-denial, self-discipline - the act of denying yourself; controlling your impulses
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

asceticism

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
زُهـد، تَنَسُّك
askeze
askese
aszkétaság
meinlætalifnaîur
asketizmus
çileciliksofuluk

asceticism

[əˈsetɪsɪzəm] Nascetismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

asceticism

[əˈsɛtɪsɪzəm] nascétisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

asceticism

nAskese f; a life of asceticismein Leben in Askese
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

asceticism

[əˈsɛtɪsɪzm] nascetismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ascetic

(əˈsetik) adjective
avoiding pleasure and comfort, especially for religious reasons. Monks lead ascetic lives.
noun
an ascetic person.
aˈscetically adverb
aˈsceticism (-sizəm) noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Benedict did not believe in harsh, ascetic practices. He was critical of those who aimed for a kind of spiritual competition or went to extremes of fasting or other forms of self-denial.
Eating only once a day, sleeping less than five hours a day, wearing only bear minimum dress even in the biting cold and not using slippers even when the mercury was touching 50 degree Celsius were some of the ascetic practices that Swami Sadanand had adopted with joy.
It is in this desert of ordinary life--for the monk as well as for any seeker --that the goal of any ascetic practices comes to fruition.
But the book is about the ascetic practices of early Christian monks who flourished in the fourth to the sixth centuries.
In another example that shows some differences in Bunchi's and Isshi's ascetic practices, Cogan points to Bunchi's decision to build a platform for the bodhisattva precepts, not the Vinaya precepts, which are at the center of Isshi's monastic practice (222).
(1) Building upon the insights of French philosopher Michel Foucault, who places the body at the center of the struggle between different formations of power/knowledge, this essay examines how different discursive formations, in this case British colonial and Indian nationalist, inscribed the body differently in their respective "regimes of truth." Responding to colonial criticisms, Gandhi reworked Hindu ascetic practices to formulate an anticolonial discourse that restructured the body's economy of pleasures prioritizing self-discipline in the service of the nation.
The result is a panoramic, often perceptive, yet also flawed account of ascetic practices and spiritual life among Russian Orthodox women over the past two centuries.
This subtle interaction between the secular ascetic practices and the hedonistic promises of modern self-help is central to one of self-help's major branches: the Seduction Community.
Despite this I could not rid myself of wayward thoughts, until I turned to the wisdom of the Besht." (15) Not surprisingly, some continued ascetic practices. Most notable was Dov Ber who became an influential Hasidic leader after the Besht's death.
These white-robed early risers had come seeking an authentic experience of traditional mountain ascetic practices along the well-trod Kumano pilgrimage route.
Acculturating into the host society, the Jews of Cochin incorporated Brahmin ascetic practices into their preparations for and observance of Passover, and they integrated symbols of maharajah nobility into their celebration of Simhat Torah.
The level on which an individual is counseled to engage in ascetic practices depends upon his character and potential.