asceticism

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as·cet·i·cism

 (ə-sĕt′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The principles and practices of an ascetic; extreme self-denial and austerity.
2. The doctrine that the ascetic life releases the soul from bondage to the body and permits union with the divine.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

asceticism

(əˈsɛtɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the behaviour, discipline, or outlook of an ascetic, esp of a religious ascetic
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the principles of ascetic practices, esp in the early Christian Church
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the theory and system of ascetic practices
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

asceticism

a severe self-deprivation for ethical, religious, or intellectual ends. — ascetic, n., adj.
See also: Behavior
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asceticism - the doctrine that through renunciation of worldly pleasures it is possible to achieve a high spiritual or intellectual stateasceticism - the doctrine that through renunciation of worldly pleasures it is possible to achieve a high spiritual or intellectual state
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
2.asceticism - the trait of great self-denial (especially refraining from worldly pleasures)asceticism - the trait of great self-denial (especially refraining from worldly pleasures)
self-denial, self-discipline - the trait of practicing self discipline
monasticism - asceticism as a form of religious life; usually conducted in a community under a common rule and characterized by celibacy and poverty and obedience
3.asceticism - rigorous self-denial and active self-restraintasceticism - rigorous self-denial and active self-restraint
self-control, self-denial, self-discipline - the act of denying yourself; controlling your impulses
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

asceticism

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
زُهـد، تَنَسُّك
askeze
askese
aszkétaság
meinlætalifnaîur
asketizmus
çileciliksofuluk

asceticism

[əˈsetɪsɪzəm] Nascetismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

asceticism

[əˈsɛtɪsɪzəm] nascétisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

asceticism

nAskese f; a life of asceticismein Leben in Askese
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

asceticism

[əˈsɛtɪsɪzm] nascetismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ascetic

(əˈsetik) adjective
avoiding pleasure and comfort, especially for religious reasons. Monks lead ascetic lives.
noun
an ascetic person.
aˈscetically adverb
aˈsceticism (-sizəm) noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
** the ascetism or zuhd (literally meaning the renunciation),
The emphasis was on repentance and the sincere intention to improve one's behaviour rather than on extremely strict ascetism (Guy 1983: 25-40).
Goodrich, Contextualizing Cassian, 211-234; Conrad Leyser, Authority and Ascetism from Augustine to Gregory the Great (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2000); Pierre de Labriolle, Histoire de la litterature latine chretienne (Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1924), 565-567.
Buddhism implies a type of other-worldly ascetism that trumps rule of law.
The king nominates a spiritual guide as a key ally, a man devoted to ascetism and inner peace; that's what this new deal often summarized as a sort of Chams-and-Khmers-make-a-pact is all about.
This controlled period (the catechumenate) could last from months to years, and involved a private examination, a quizzing on the grounds for requesting accession to Christianity, accepting the rules of a Christian life, and the passing of a test at the end of the catechumenate, followed by a period of ascetism (fasting, vigils, kneeling and prayer) to test the rigour of faith and preparation for the baptismal battle with Satan (GoL, 149-150).
Their consequential renunciation of core Calvinist doctrines at the time of the revival did not include the abandonment of the religious practice "in the world." For complementary study, see Max Weber's characterization of Protestantism as "inner-worldly ascetism" in Economy and Society (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1954).
Peter Brown is also invoked for stressing this "ferocious emphasis on self-awareness" in relation with the stream of thoughts (logismos), without precedent untill Christian ascetism (P.
In her teachings Lal Ded advocated life of intimacy with God through ascetism and meditation.
Anderson translated Groslier's conclusion thus: 'Other peoples of Indochina have had a destiny no less remarkable than the destinies of those peoples who have "emerged" into history by their writing and their temples.' (18) Anderson's short book, The fate of rural hell: Ascetism and desire in Buddhist Thailand, (19) originally published in Thai in Aan magazine, focuses on a kind of vulgar temple culture.
We see that the author of the Castle is dominated by a sense of "refusal generated by a kind of monastic self-interdiction, a quasi-religious ascetism, a homage paid to writing, and coming from an extreme tension ranging from concrete sensuality to one elated by myth".