ascites

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as·ci·tes

 (ə-sī′tēz)
n. pl. ascites
An abnormal accumulation of serous fluid in the abdominal cavity.

[Middle English aschites, from Late Latin ascītēs, from Greek askītēs, from askos, belly, wineskin.]

as·cit′ic (-sĭt′ĭk) adj.

ascites

(əˈsaɪtiːz)
n, pl ascites
(Pathology) accumulation of serous fluid in the peritoneal cavity
[C14: from Latin: a kind of dropsy, from Greek askitēs, from askos wineskin]
ascitic adj

as•ci•tes

(əˈsaɪ tiz)

n.
accumulation of serous fluid in the peritoneal cavity.
[1350–1400; < Medieval Latin < Greek askítēs (hýdrōps) abdominal (edema) =ask(ós) belly + -itēs -ite1]
as•cit•ic (əˈsɪt ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ascites - accumulation of serous fluid in peritoneal cavityascites - accumulation of serous fluid in peritoneal cavity
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
Translations

as·ci·tes

n. ascitis, acumulación de líquido en la cavidad abdominal.

ascites

n ascitis f
References in periodicals archive ?
Specimens such as pus aspirate, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, sputum, urine, pleural fluid, corneal scrapings and ascitic fluid received in Microbiology laboratory for culture and sensitivity.
Because of these negative results for virus infections, an ascitic fluid sample was tested by PCR for LCMV.
Ascitic fluid analysis also revealed exudative picture with no evidence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.
Ascitic fluid should be sent for the analysis of the cell count and culture; Gram staining; total protein concentration; albumin, glucose, LDH, amylase, and triglyceride levels; and cytology.
The ascitic fluid did not show any malignancy and the final diagnosis was a left ovarian benign cystic teratoma and right ovarian papillary serous cystadenoma.
Their detection can be carried out either in tissue or in body fluids like ascitic fluid or pleural fluid and serum.
Aspirated ascitic fluid did not yield malignant cells, and cultures were negative for mycobacterial, acid-fast bacilli, or aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.
His inflammatory markers were unremarkable, and his ultrasound showed fluid-filled bowel loops, with no ascitic fluid.
Bacterial cultures, ascitic fluid (AF) leukocyte, C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum PCT measurements were carried out prior to the use of antibiotics.
1 mg/dL, and cancer antigen 125 of ascitic fluid was negative.
The EPTB samples include pus, pleural fluid, ascitic fluid, pericardial fluid and CSF.