Asclepias exaltata


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Asclepias exaltata - milkweed of the eastern United States with leaves resembling those of pokeweedAsclepias exaltata - milkweed of the eastern United States with leaves resembling those of pokeweed
milkweed, silkweed - any of numerous plants of the genus Asclepias having milky juice and pods that split open releasing seeds with downy tufts
References in periodicals archive ?
Twenty-one of the 93 native species have C values of 7 or higher, including Carex careyana, Iris brevicaulis and Oligoneuron riddellii with C = 9, Amelanchier laevis, Aristolochia serpentaria, Asclepias exaltata, Carya laciniosa, Epifagus virginiana, Erigeron pulchellus, Trillium grandiflorum and Veronicastrum virginicum with C = 8, and 10 species with C = 7 (Appendix 1).
Additionally, three species, e.g., Asclepias exaltata, Gentianella quinquefolia, and Silphium integrifolium, which were not found during the current study but had been documented previously with photography, are included in the list.
Proximate and ultimate causes of low fruit production in Asclepias exaltata. Oikos 44: 373-381.
population of Asclepias exaltata: multiple paternity, functional gender,
Paternity analysis in a natural population of Asclepias exaltata: multiple paternity, functional gender, and the "pollen-donation hypothesis".
Effective pollen dispersal in a natural population of Asclepias exaltata: the influence of pollinator behavior, genetic similarity, and mating success.
Paternity analysis in a natural population of Asclepias exaltata - multiple paternity, functional gender, and the pollen-donation hypothesis.
In an isolated population of the insect-pollinated milkweed, Asclepias exaltata, for example, Broyles and Wyatt (1991) found 11% pollen gene flow and a distribution of intermate distances that mimicked closely the distribution of interplant distances.
Asclepias exaltata is a perennial herb native to moist forest openings from northern Georgia to Maine and westward to Minnesota and Iowa (Woodson 1954).
The consequences of self-pollination in Asclepias exaltata, a self-incompatible milkweed.
Asclepias exaltata is a perennial herb native to woodland habitats in eastern North America from northern Georgia to Maine and westward to Minnesota and Iowa (Woodson 1954).