Ashkenazi


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Related to Ashkenazi: Sephardic

Ash·ke·naz·i

 (äsh′kə-nä′zē)
n. pl. Ash·ke·naz·im (-năz′ĭm, -nä′zĭm)
A member of the branch of European Jews, historically Yiddish-speaking, who settled in central and eastern Europe.

[Medieval Hebrew 'aškənāzî, from 'aškənaz, Germany, adoption of Hebrew 'aškənaz, name of one of Noah's grandsons and of a neighboring people, perhaps alteration of earlier *'aškûz, Scythians; akin to Akkadian ašguzai, iškuzai, from Old Persian Saka-, Skūča-.]

Ash′ke·naz′ic (-nä′zĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Ashkenazi

(ˌæʃkəˈnɑːzɪ)
n, pl -zim (-zɪm)
1. (Peoples) (modifier) of or relating to the Jews of Germany and E Europe
2. (Peoples) a Jew of German or E European descent
3. (Languages) the pronunciation of Hebrew used by these Jews
[C19: Late Hebrew, from Hebrew Ashkenaz, the son of Gomer (Genesis 10:3; I Chronicles 1:6), a descendant of Noah through Japheth, and hence taken to be identified with the ancient Ascanians of Phrygia and, in the medieval period, the Germans]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ash•ke•naz•i

(ˌɑʃ kəˈnɑ zi)

n., pl. -naz•im (-ˈnɑ zɪm)
a Jew of central or E European origin or ancestry; a member of one of the two main branches of world Jewry distinguished from each other by liturgy, ritual, and pronunciation of Hebrew. Compare Sephardi.
[1830–40; < post-Biblical Hebrew ashkənazzīm, pl. of ashkənazzī <ashkənaz medieval Hebrew name for Germany]
Ash`ke•naz′ic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ashkenazi - a Jew of eastern European or German descentAshkenazi - a Jew of eastern European or German descent
Jew, Hebrew, Israelite - a person belonging to the worldwide group claiming descent from Jacob (or converted to it) and connected by cultural or religious ties
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Ashkenazi

[ˌæʃkəˈnɑːzɪ]
A. ADJaskenazí
B. N (Ashkenazim (pl)) [ˌæʃkəˈnɑːzɪm]askenazí mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
There have been cases that public schools have refused to enroll Ethiopian children as early as the first or second grade; because Ashkenazi parents refuse to have Ethiopians in the school.
Are Ashkenazi Jews more inherently quarrelsome than other people?
The Stars Group's chief executive Rafi Ashkenazi told an investors' conference call yesterday: "We have been engaged in a discussion for a while now, for approximately a year.
While wage data published by the National Insurance Institute allow for a comparison of localities, the Central Bureau of Statistics data allow for a comparison among the three main ethnicities in Israel--Mizrahi Jews, Ashkenazi Jews, and Arabs.
What they discovered was shocking; The Druze are genetically closer to people in the Caucuses, Turkey, and Ashkenazi Jews then they are to any other ethnic group in the Middle East.
BiondVax Pharmaceuticals Ltd (NASDAQ: BVXV, TASE: BVXV), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company, has added Professor Shai Ashkenazi to its Scientific Advisory Board, it was reported yesterday.
My problem has been that Ashkenazi Jews have failed to acknowledge and recognize me as a Jew.
Citing the radical transformation of the Ashkenazi civilization after 1945, Schwarz focuses on the latest chapter of this civilization following its destruction in Central and Eastern Europe in the Holocaust.
The investigators base their recommendation on a study they conducted in the Ashkenazi Jewish population of Israel.
In 1580, in Gniezno, Poland, Rabbi Eliezer Ashkenazi (1513-1586) completed his magnum opus, Sefer Ma'aseh Hashem, an extensive examination of the narrative portions of the Tanakh.
Some races have a tendency to carry these dangerous genes - Jewish women of Ashkenazi descent ( from Central and Eastern Europe) are one of them.